Effects of lead, cadmium, chromium, and arsenic on the sorption of lindane and norfloxacin by river biofilms, particles, and sediments

Effects of lead, cadmium, chromium, and arsenic on the sorption of lindane and norfloxacin by... The sorption of both classic and emerging organic contaminants onto aquatic solids is a critical process that controls their fate in natural waters. Sorption is affected by numerous factors, including coexisting heavy metals. The mechanisms of the influence of heavy metals, especially those occurring in acid radical anions, are still unclear. Here, the effects of Pb, Cd, Cr, and As on the sorption of lindane and norfloxacin (NOR) onto natural biofilms, suspended particles, and sediments from one river were investigated following batch equilibration methods. In addition, changes in representative components that have important roles in sorption from these solids in the presence and absence of metals were characterized by spectrum analyses. The results indicated that sorption of lindane and NOR on the three solids in the absence of heavy metals was highly linear and nonlinear, respectively. Pb and Cd promoted and Cr and As suppressed hydrophobic lindane sorption on the three solids. This was because Pb and Cd enhanced but Cr and As weakened the hydrophobicity of these solids. Pb, Cd, Cr, and As decreased NOR sorption on sediments and suspended particles at pH 5.7~6.3. This was due to electrostatic competition between cationic Pb/Cd and NORH2 +, and the combination of Cr/As acid radicals with NORH2 +, which suppressed its ion-exchange adsorption. Pb, Cd, Cr, and As generally increased the sorption of NOR onto the biofilms at pH 5.7~6.3. Pb and Cd strengthened the flocculation of dissolved organic matter combined with NORH2 + onto the biofilms. Cr and As enhanced the hydrophilicity of biofilms, and then increased their sorption of NOR with active hydrophilic groups. The mechanisms of how different heavy metals affect NOR sorption by biofilms were more complicated than the mechanisms affecting lindane sorption, as well as by sediments and particles. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Science and Pollution Research Springer Journals

Effects of lead, cadmium, chromium, and arsenic on the sorption of lindane and norfloxacin by river biofilms, particles, and sediments

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Environmental Chemistry; Ecotoxicology; Environmental Health; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution
ISSN
0944-1344
eISSN
1614-7499
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11356-017-0840-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The sorption of both classic and emerging organic contaminants onto aquatic solids is a critical process that controls their fate in natural waters. Sorption is affected by numerous factors, including coexisting heavy metals. The mechanisms of the influence of heavy metals, especially those occurring in acid radical anions, are still unclear. Here, the effects of Pb, Cd, Cr, and As on the sorption of lindane and norfloxacin (NOR) onto natural biofilms, suspended particles, and sediments from one river were investigated following batch equilibration methods. In addition, changes in representative components that have important roles in sorption from these solids in the presence and absence of metals were characterized by spectrum analyses. The results indicated that sorption of lindane and NOR on the three solids in the absence of heavy metals was highly linear and nonlinear, respectively. Pb and Cd promoted and Cr and As suppressed hydrophobic lindane sorption on the three solids. This was because Pb and Cd enhanced but Cr and As weakened the hydrophobicity of these solids. Pb, Cd, Cr, and As decreased NOR sorption on sediments and suspended particles at pH 5.7~6.3. This was due to electrostatic competition between cationic Pb/Cd and NORH2 +, and the combination of Cr/As acid radicals with NORH2 +, which suppressed its ion-exchange adsorption. Pb, Cd, Cr, and As generally increased the sorption of NOR onto the biofilms at pH 5.7~6.3. Pb and Cd strengthened the flocculation of dissolved organic matter combined with NORH2 + onto the biofilms. Cr and As enhanced the hydrophilicity of biofilms, and then increased their sorption of NOR with active hydrophilic groups. The mechanisms of how different heavy metals affect NOR sorption by biofilms were more complicated than the mechanisms affecting lindane sorption, as well as by sediments and particles.

Journal

Environmental Science and Pollution ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 1, 2017

References

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