Effects of Environmental Factors on Byssal Thread Formation in Some Members of the Family Mytilidae from the Sea of Japan

Effects of Environmental Factors on Byssal Thread Formation in Some Members of the Family... The ability to attach repeatedly to a substrate (glass, boulders, sand) in three common mussel species of the upper sublittoral zone of the Sea of Japan, Grayan's mussel Crenomytilus grayanus, the Korean mussel Mytilus coruscus, and northern horse mussel Modiolus modiolus, was studied under experimental conditions. It was found that during 120 h of the experiment C. grayanus and M. modiolus produced more byssal threads than M. coruscus. A decrease in the water temperature from 20 to 0°C slowed the rate of production of byssal threads down to full passivity in some experimental mollusks. This was more typical of M. coruscus and less typical of C. grayanus. Renewed threads differed in their length, thick, size of the adhesive plate, and strength. M. coruscus formed the shortest, thickest, and strongest threads with rather a large adhesive disk. The observed differences are discussed from the position of morphophysiological adaptations of species for colonization of different natural substrata under contrasting conditions of the upper sublittoral zone. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Marine Biology Springer Journals

Effects of Environmental Factors on Byssal Thread Formation in Some Members of the Family Mytilidae from the Sea of Japan

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology
ISSN
1063-0740
eISSN
1608-3377
D.O.I.
10.1023/B:RUMB.0000046549.86598.f4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The ability to attach repeatedly to a substrate (glass, boulders, sand) in three common mussel species of the upper sublittoral zone of the Sea of Japan, Grayan's mussel Crenomytilus grayanus, the Korean mussel Mytilus coruscus, and northern horse mussel Modiolus modiolus, was studied under experimental conditions. It was found that during 120 h of the experiment C. grayanus and M. modiolus produced more byssal threads than M. coruscus. A decrease in the water temperature from 20 to 0°C slowed the rate of production of byssal threads down to full passivity in some experimental mollusks. This was more typical of M. coruscus and less typical of C. grayanus. Renewed threads differed in their length, thick, size of the adhesive plate, and strength. M. coruscus formed the shortest, thickest, and strongest threads with rather a large adhesive disk. The observed differences are discussed from the position of morphophysiological adaptations of species for colonization of different natural substrata under contrasting conditions of the upper sublittoral zone.

Journal

Russian Journal of Marine BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Nov 19, 2004

References

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