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Effects of enhanced ultraviolet-B radiation, water deficit, and their combination on UV-absorbing compounds and osmotic adjustment substances in two different moss species

Effects of enhanced ultraviolet-B radiation, water deficit, and their combination on UV-absorbing... A simulation experiment was conducted to explore the influence of enhanced ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation, water deficit, and their combination on UV-absorbing compounds and osmotic adjustment substances of mosses Bryum argenteum and Didymodon vinealis isolated from biological soil crusts (BSCs) growing in a revegetated area of the Tengger Desert, China. Four levels of UV-B radiation and two gradients of water regime were employed. Compared with their controls, amounts of total flavonoids, chlorophyll, carotenoids, soluble sugars, and soluble proteins significantly decreased (p < 0.05), but proline content significantly increased (p < 0.05), when exposed to either enhanced UV-B or water deficit. The negative effects of enhanced UV-B were alleviated when water deficit was applied. There were increases in UV-absorbing compounds and osmotic adjustment substances when exposed to a combination of enhanced UV-B and water deficit compared with single stresses, except for the proline content in D. vinealis. In addition, our results also indicated interspecific differences in response to enhanced UV-B, water deficit, and their combination. Compared with B. argenteum, D. vinealis was more resistant to enhanced UV-B and water deficit singly and in combination. These results suggest that the damage of enhanced UV-B on both species might be alleviated by water deficit. This alleviation is important for understanding the response of BSCs to UV-B radiation in future global climate change. This also provides novel insights into assessment damages of UV-B to BSC stability in arid and semiarid regions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Science and Pollution Research Springer Journals

Effects of enhanced ultraviolet-B radiation, water deficit, and their combination on UV-absorbing compounds and osmotic adjustment substances in two different moss species

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Environmental Chemistry; Ecotoxicology; Environmental Health; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution
ISSN
0944-1344
eISSN
1614-7499
DOI
10.1007/s11356-018-1689-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A simulation experiment was conducted to explore the influence of enhanced ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation, water deficit, and their combination on UV-absorbing compounds and osmotic adjustment substances of mosses Bryum argenteum and Didymodon vinealis isolated from biological soil crusts (BSCs) growing in a revegetated area of the Tengger Desert, China. Four levels of UV-B radiation and two gradients of water regime were employed. Compared with their controls, amounts of total flavonoids, chlorophyll, carotenoids, soluble sugars, and soluble proteins significantly decreased (p < 0.05), but proline content significantly increased (p < 0.05), when exposed to either enhanced UV-B or water deficit. The negative effects of enhanced UV-B were alleviated when water deficit was applied. There were increases in UV-absorbing compounds and osmotic adjustment substances when exposed to a combination of enhanced UV-B and water deficit compared with single stresses, except for the proline content in D. vinealis. In addition, our results also indicated interspecific differences in response to enhanced UV-B, water deficit, and their combination. Compared with B. argenteum, D. vinealis was more resistant to enhanced UV-B and water deficit singly and in combination. These results suggest that the damage of enhanced UV-B on both species might be alleviated by water deficit. This alleviation is important for understanding the response of BSCs to UV-B radiation in future global climate change. This also provides novel insights into assessment damages of UV-B to BSC stability in arid and semiarid regions.

Journal

Environmental Science and Pollution ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 16, 2018

References