Effects of Diet-Induced Obesity on Tracheal Responsiveness to Methacholine, Tracheal Visfatin Level, and Lung Histological Changes in Ovalbumin-Sensitized Female Wistar Rats

Effects of Diet-Induced Obesity on Tracheal Responsiveness to Methacholine, Tracheal Visfatin... Many studies have shown a close relationship between obesity and asthma severity. In the present study, the effects of diet-induced obesity were examined on airway responsiveness to methacholine in addition to visfatin level in female Wistar rats’ tracheae after sensitization with ovalbumin. The rats were divided into four groups: control with normal diet (ND), ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized with normal diet (S + ND), high-fat diet (HFD), and OVA-sensitized with a high-fat diet (S + HFD). The animals were fed for 8 weeks with standard pelts or high-fat diet and then sensitized and challenged with OVA or saline for another 4 weeks. At the end of the study, the tracheae were isolated and assessed for airway responsiveness and visfatin protein levels. Diet-induced obesity groups developed increased weight and obesity indices (p < 0.001). After sensitization with OVA and diet-induced obesity, there were marked leftward shifts in methacholine concentration-response curves in S + HFD group compared to other groups. Also, maximum response was the highest (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001), EC50 was the lowest (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001), and visfatin protein level was the highest (p < 0.05 to p < 0.01) in S + HFD. According to results, diet-induced obesity caused airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine and enhanced visfatin protein levels in the tracheae of ovalbumin-sensitized female rats. Our results suggested that, in obese ovalbumin-sensitized conditions in female rats, the local production of adipocytokines, such as visfatin, may be increased, resulting in the deterioration of inflammation in lungs. This finding shows a possible mechanism for the altered phenotype in obesity-ovalbumin sensitization conditions in female rats. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Inflammation Springer Journals

Effects of Diet-Induced Obesity on Tracheal Responsiveness to Methacholine, Tracheal Visfatin Level, and Lung Histological Changes in Ovalbumin-Sensitized Female Wistar Rats

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Rheumatology; Internal Medicine; Pharmacology/Toxicology; Pathology
ISSN
0360-3997
eISSN
1573-2576
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10753-018-0738-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Many studies have shown a close relationship between obesity and asthma severity. In the present study, the effects of diet-induced obesity were examined on airway responsiveness to methacholine in addition to visfatin level in female Wistar rats’ tracheae after sensitization with ovalbumin. The rats were divided into four groups: control with normal diet (ND), ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized with normal diet (S + ND), high-fat diet (HFD), and OVA-sensitized with a high-fat diet (S + HFD). The animals were fed for 8 weeks with standard pelts or high-fat diet and then sensitized and challenged with OVA or saline for another 4 weeks. At the end of the study, the tracheae were isolated and assessed for airway responsiveness and visfatin protein levels. Diet-induced obesity groups developed increased weight and obesity indices (p < 0.001). After sensitization with OVA and diet-induced obesity, there were marked leftward shifts in methacholine concentration-response curves in S + HFD group compared to other groups. Also, maximum response was the highest (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001), EC50 was the lowest (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001), and visfatin protein level was the highest (p < 0.05 to p < 0.01) in S + HFD. According to results, diet-induced obesity caused airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine and enhanced visfatin protein levels in the tracheae of ovalbumin-sensitized female rats. Our results suggested that, in obese ovalbumin-sensitized conditions in female rats, the local production of adipocytokines, such as visfatin, may be increased, resulting in the deterioration of inflammation in lungs. This finding shows a possible mechanism for the altered phenotype in obesity-ovalbumin sensitization conditions in female rats.

Journal

InflammationSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 29, 2018

References

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