Effects of Depression on the Subsequent Year’s Healthcare Expenditures Among Older Adults: Two-Year Panel Study

Effects of Depression on the Subsequent Year’s Healthcare Expenditures Among Older Adults:... This study investigated changes in depression status over 2 years and examined whether having depression in Year 1 is associated with greater healthcare expenditures in Year 2 among community-dwelling older adults. This study analyzed the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (Panel 13, 2008–2009) for a nationally representative sample of 1,740 older adults (65+). The two self-reported depression measures used were the ICD-9-CM (depression) and Patient Health Questionnaire-2 (potential depression, scores 3 or higher). Using the combined two-part models, additional healthcare costs at Year 2 associated with the Year 1 depression status were calculated by the service type after adjusting for predisposing, enabling, and need covariates assessed at Year 2. Over 7.9 % of older adults reported depression and an additional 6.5 % presented with potential depression. The ICD-9 depression status was relatively stable; 84 % continued reporting depression during Year 2. Those with depression at Year 1 spent $3,855 more on total healthcare, $1,053 more on office-based visits, and $929 more on prescription drugs during Year 2 compared with non-depressed people after controlling for other covariates, including healthcare needs (p < .05). While potential depression was less persistent (31.1 % remained potentially depressed at Year 2), potential depression was associated with lower socio-economic status and greater healthcare expenditures from home health services and emergency department visits during Year 2. These results indicate the importance of monitoring depression in older adults, considering its impacts on the increases in healthcare expenditures in the following year even after controlling for co-occurring health conditions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychiatric Quarterly Springer Journals

Effects of Depression on the Subsequent Year’s Healthcare Expenditures Among Older Adults: Two-Year Panel Study

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Psychiatry; Public Health; Sociology, general
ISSN
0033-2720
eISSN
1573-6709
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11126-014-9324-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study investigated changes in depression status over 2 years and examined whether having depression in Year 1 is associated with greater healthcare expenditures in Year 2 among community-dwelling older adults. This study analyzed the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (Panel 13, 2008–2009) for a nationally representative sample of 1,740 older adults (65+). The two self-reported depression measures used were the ICD-9-CM (depression) and Patient Health Questionnaire-2 (potential depression, scores 3 or higher). Using the combined two-part models, additional healthcare costs at Year 2 associated with the Year 1 depression status were calculated by the service type after adjusting for predisposing, enabling, and need covariates assessed at Year 2. Over 7.9 % of older adults reported depression and an additional 6.5 % presented with potential depression. The ICD-9 depression status was relatively stable; 84 % continued reporting depression during Year 2. Those with depression at Year 1 spent $3,855 more on total healthcare, $1,053 more on office-based visits, and $929 more on prescription drugs during Year 2 compared with non-depressed people after controlling for other covariates, including healthcare needs (p < .05). While potential depression was less persistent (31.1 % remained potentially depressed at Year 2), potential depression was associated with lower socio-economic status and greater healthcare expenditures from home health services and emergency department visits during Year 2. These results indicate the importance of monitoring depression in older adults, considering its impacts on the increases in healthcare expenditures in the following year even after controlling for co-occurring health conditions.

Journal

Psychiatric QuarterlySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 28, 2014

References

  • Are older people dying of depression? Findings from the medical research council trial of the assessment and management of older people in the community
    Adamson, JA; Price, GM; Breeze, E; Bulpitt, CJ; Fletcher, AE
  • Healthcare costs associated with depression in medically ill fee-for-service Medicare participants
    Unützer, J; Schoenbaum, M; Katon, WJ
  • Out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures of older Americans with depression
    Harman, JS; Kelleher, KJ; Reynolds, CF; Pincus, HA
  • Major depression and emergency medical services utilization in community-dwelling elderly persons with disabilities
    Lee, BW; Conwell, Y; Shah, MN; Barker, WH; Delavan, RL; Friedman, B
  • The prognosis of depression in older patients in general practice and the community. A systematic review
    Licht-Strunk, E; Windt, D; Marwijk, H; Haan, M; Beekman, A
  • Exploring racial and ethnic disparities in prescription drug spending and use among Medicare beneficiaries
    Gaskin, DJ; Briesacher, BA; Limcangco, R; Brigantti, BL
  • Health care expenditures of immigrants in the United States: A nationally representative analysis
    Mohanty, SA; Woolhandler, S; Himmelstein, DU; Pati, S; Carrasquillo, O; Bor, DH

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