Effects of Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors on Proton Exchange and Photosynthesis in Pea Protoplasts

Effects of Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors on Proton Exchange and Photosynthesis in Pea Protoplasts At concentrations of 100–200 μM, ethoxyzolamide, a lipophilic inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase, considerably (by 60%) inhibited light-induced CO2-dependent oxygen evolution in pea protoplasts at the optimum concentration of inorganic carbon (100 μM CO2) in the medium. At the same concentrations of the inhibitor, electron transport in isolated pea thylakoids was inhibited only by 6–9%. Acetazolamide, a water-soluble inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase, affected neither the rate of CO2-dependent O2evolution in protoplasts nor electron transport in thylakoid membranes. A light-dependent proton uptake by protoplasts was demonstrated. At pH 7.2, the induction kinetics and the rate of proton uptake were similar to those for CO2-dependent O2evolution. The rate of proton uptake was decreased twofold by 1 mM acetazolamide. This fact agrees with the notion that a membrane-bound carbonic anhydrase is operative in the plasma membrane of higher plant cells. A mechanism of its functioning is suggested. Possible functions of carbonic anhydrases in the cells of C3-plants are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Effects of Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors on Proton Exchange and Photosynthesis in Pea Protoplasts

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1016747312533
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

At concentrations of 100–200 μM, ethoxyzolamide, a lipophilic inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase, considerably (by 60%) inhibited light-induced CO2-dependent oxygen evolution in pea protoplasts at the optimum concentration of inorganic carbon (100 μM CO2) in the medium. At the same concentrations of the inhibitor, electron transport in isolated pea thylakoids was inhibited only by 6–9%. Acetazolamide, a water-soluble inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase, affected neither the rate of CO2-dependent O2evolution in protoplasts nor electron transport in thylakoid membranes. A light-dependent proton uptake by protoplasts was demonstrated. At pH 7.2, the induction kinetics and the rate of proton uptake were similar to those for CO2-dependent O2evolution. The rate of proton uptake was decreased twofold by 1 mM acetazolamide. This fact agrees with the notion that a membrane-bound carbonic anhydrase is operative in the plasma membrane of higher plant cells. A mechanism of its functioning is suggested. Possible functions of carbonic anhydrases in the cells of C3-plants are discussed.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 10, 2004

References

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