Effects of Cannabinoids on Tension Induced by Acetylcholine and Choline in Slow Skeletal Muscle Fibers of the Frog

Effects of Cannabinoids on Tension Induced by Acetylcholine and Choline in Slow Skeletal Muscle... We investigated the effects of cannabinoids on acetylcholine (ACh) or choline contractures in slow skeletal muscle fibers from Rana pipiens. Bundles of cruralis muscle fibers were incubated with the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) agonist, arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA), which diminished the maximum isometric tension by 10 % and the total tension by 5 % of the ACh contracture, and 40 and 22 % of the choline contracture, respectively. Preincubation with the CB1 antagonist, AM281, or with pertussis toxin (PTX) completely blocked the effect of ACPA on the ACh contracture. On the other hand, the decrease in choline contracture by ACPA was only partially blocked by AM281 (~16 % decrease), PTX (20 %), or by dantrolene (~46 %). Our results show that ACPA modulates ACh and choline contractures, and suggest that this effect involves the participation of CB1, the ACh receptor, and −RyR in ACh contractures. For choline contractures, ACPA may also be acting through cannabinoid receptor-independent mechanisms. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Membrane Biology Springer Journals

Effects of Cannabinoids on Tension Induced by Acetylcholine and Choline in Slow Skeletal Muscle Fibers of the Frog

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Human Physiology
ISSN
0022-2631
eISSN
1432-1424
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00232-013-9610-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We investigated the effects of cannabinoids on acetylcholine (ACh) or choline contractures in slow skeletal muscle fibers from Rana pipiens. Bundles of cruralis muscle fibers were incubated with the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) agonist, arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA), which diminished the maximum isometric tension by 10 % and the total tension by 5 % of the ACh contracture, and 40 and 22 % of the choline contracture, respectively. Preincubation with the CB1 antagonist, AM281, or with pertussis toxin (PTX) completely blocked the effect of ACPA on the ACh contracture. On the other hand, the decrease in choline contracture by ACPA was only partially blocked by AM281 (~16 % decrease), PTX (20 %), or by dantrolene (~46 %). Our results show that ACPA modulates ACh and choline contractures, and suggest that this effect involves the participation of CB1, the ACh receptor, and −RyR in ACh contractures. For choline contractures, ACPA may also be acting through cannabinoid receptor-independent mechanisms.

Journal

The Journal of Membrane BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Nov 12, 2013

References

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