Effectiveness of vertical posture recovery after external pushing impact in athletes specialized in different sports

Effectiveness of vertical posture recovery after external pushing impact in athletes specialized... The ability of athletes with different training specializations to recover vertical posture after an external pushing impact was studied. Athletes engaged in cyclic exercise sports (jogging, n = 7) and complex coordinate sports (wrestling, n = 10) and nonathletes (control, n = 10) were the subjects of this study. The recovery of vertical position after a small external pushing impact on the arms extended forward was assessed using stabilography. We determined the maximum amplitude (Amp-m) of deviation from the general center of pressure, the reaction time (RT) and the velocity of reaction (V-r), as well as the variance and mean velocity of vertical posture oscillations before and after an impact. It was found that, although no differences were observed in the vertical posture stability before pushing, the Amp-m was lower in the wrestlers than in the control group (by 17.5%, p = 0.018 under the eye-open conditions; by 27.3%, p = 0.002 under the eye-closed conditions). The deprivation of visual information about the pushing moment increases the Amp-m and V-r and had no effect on the RT in all groups. Under the eye-closed conditions, an increase in Amp-m as a result of pushing was significantly lower in the wrestlers (p = 0.033) than in the control group. Under the eye-closed conditions, the accuracy of the recovery of the initial vertical position after pushing was higher in the wrestlers than in the control group (p = 0.027). The indicators of postural stability, displacement of the center of pressure, and vertical posture sway and recovery after pushing did not differ between the runners and other groups. Therefore, compared to cyclic exercises, training in complex coordinating sports more effectively improves the ability to maintain vertical posture in response to its perturbation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Physiology Springer Journals

Effectiveness of vertical posture recovery after external pushing impact in athletes specialized in different sports

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Publisher
Pleiades Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Pleiades Publishing, Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Life Sciences, general; Human Physiology; Biomedicine, general
ISSN
0362-1197
eISSN
1608-3164
D.O.I.
10.1134/S0362119717030136
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The ability of athletes with different training specializations to recover vertical posture after an external pushing impact was studied. Athletes engaged in cyclic exercise sports (jogging, n = 7) and complex coordinate sports (wrestling, n = 10) and nonathletes (control, n = 10) were the subjects of this study. The recovery of vertical position after a small external pushing impact on the arms extended forward was assessed using stabilography. We determined the maximum amplitude (Amp-m) of deviation from the general center of pressure, the reaction time (RT) and the velocity of reaction (V-r), as well as the variance and mean velocity of vertical posture oscillations before and after an impact. It was found that, although no differences were observed in the vertical posture stability before pushing, the Amp-m was lower in the wrestlers than in the control group (by 17.5%, p = 0.018 under the eye-open conditions; by 27.3%, p = 0.002 under the eye-closed conditions). The deprivation of visual information about the pushing moment increases the Amp-m and V-r and had no effect on the RT in all groups. Under the eye-closed conditions, an increase in Amp-m as a result of pushing was significantly lower in the wrestlers (p = 0.033) than in the control group. Under the eye-closed conditions, the accuracy of the recovery of the initial vertical position after pushing was higher in the wrestlers than in the control group (p = 0.027). The indicators of postural stability, displacement of the center of pressure, and vertical posture sway and recovery after pushing did not differ between the runners and other groups. Therefore, compared to cyclic exercises, training in complex coordinating sports more effectively improves the ability to maintain vertical posture in response to its perturbation.

Journal

Human PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 1, 2017

References

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