Effectiveness and feasibility of robotic gastric neurostimulator placement in patients with refractory gastroparesis

Effectiveness and feasibility of robotic gastric neurostimulator placement in patients with... Gastric neurostimulation (GNS) with Enterra® therapy device (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) appears as the last resort for patients with refractory gastroparesis. Currently, the device has Humanitarian Use status by Food and Drug Administration, thereby requiring further investigation. We aim to describe its feasibility and clinical outcomes using robotic technique. From June 2014 to September 2016, 15 consecutive patients underwent robotic insertion of Enterra® device. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and clinical outcomes including mortality, length of stay, readmission rates, reoperation and complications were retrospectively collected. Patients were also assessed based on a validated 14-point questionnaire regarding satisfaction with the operation, quality of life and symptomatic relief. Mean age was 41.6 years ± 13.8 and there were 11 females (73.3%). No mortality was reported. The annual hospital admissions were reduced after GNS (2.5 ± 4.1 vs. 3.6 ± 4.4, p = 0.004). The frequency of bloating (p = 0.029) and severity of emesis (p = 0.038), early satiety (p = 0.042) and bloating (p = 0.031) were reduced after GNS. The severity and frequency total scores were also improved after GNS (12.6 ± 1.4 vs. 18.1 ± 2.7, p = 0.008 and 12.9 ± 2.2 vs. 16.1 ± 1.1, p = 0.016, respectively). This is the first report describing the clinical experience with robotic insertion of GNS device. This approach is safe and feasible and seems to have similar long-term outcomes as laparoscopic technique. Potential advantages to robotic technique include enhanced dexterity and suturing of the device within gastric wall. Further experience with large prospective studies and randomized clinical trials may be warranted. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Robotic Surgery Springer Journals

Effectiveness and feasibility of robotic gastric neurostimulator placement in patients with refractory gastroparesis

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag London Ltd.
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Minimally Invasive Surgery; Surgery; Urology
ISSN
1863-2483
eISSN
1863-2491
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11701-017-0732-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Gastric neurostimulation (GNS) with Enterra® therapy device (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) appears as the last resort for patients with refractory gastroparesis. Currently, the device has Humanitarian Use status by Food and Drug Administration, thereby requiring further investigation. We aim to describe its feasibility and clinical outcomes using robotic technique. From June 2014 to September 2016, 15 consecutive patients underwent robotic insertion of Enterra® device. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and clinical outcomes including mortality, length of stay, readmission rates, reoperation and complications were retrospectively collected. Patients were also assessed based on a validated 14-point questionnaire regarding satisfaction with the operation, quality of life and symptomatic relief. Mean age was 41.6 years ± 13.8 and there were 11 females (73.3%). No mortality was reported. The annual hospital admissions were reduced after GNS (2.5 ± 4.1 vs. 3.6 ± 4.4, p = 0.004). The frequency of bloating (p = 0.029) and severity of emesis (p = 0.038), early satiety (p = 0.042) and bloating (p = 0.031) were reduced after GNS. The severity and frequency total scores were also improved after GNS (12.6 ± 1.4 vs. 18.1 ± 2.7, p = 0.008 and 12.9 ± 2.2 vs. 16.1 ± 1.1, p = 0.016, respectively). This is the first report describing the clinical experience with robotic insertion of GNS device. This approach is safe and feasible and seems to have similar long-term outcomes as laparoscopic technique. Potential advantages to robotic technique include enhanced dexterity and suturing of the device within gastric wall. Further experience with large prospective studies and randomized clinical trials may be warranted.

Journal

Journal of Robotic SurgerySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 20, 2017

References

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