Effect of water deficit on respiration of conducting bundles in leaf petioles of sugar beet

Effect of water deficit on respiration of conducting bundles in leaf petioles of sugar beet Isolated fibrovascular bundles from source leaf petioles of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) and hog-weed (Heracleum sosnovskyi L.) were used to study the influence of long-term drought on the oxygen uptake rate and activities of mitochondrial oxidases, i.e., cytochrome oxidase and salicylhydroxamic acid-sensitive alternative oxidase (AO). Under normal soil moisture content (70% of full water-retaining capacity, WRC), the oxygen uptake by sugar beet conducting bundles was characterized by a high rate (> 700 μl O2/(g fr wt h)) and by distinct cytochrome oxidase-dependent manner of terminal oxidation (up to 80% inhibition of respiration in the presence of 0.5 mM KCN). After long-term water deficit (40% of WRC), the bundle respiration proceeded at nearly the same rate but featured an elevated resistance to cyanide. At early drought stage (10 days), a decrease in the activity of cytochrome-mediated oxidation pathway was largely counterbalanced by activation of mitochondrial AO, whereas long-term dehydration of plants was accompanied by activation of additional oxidative systems insensitive to both KCN and SHAM. Similar but even more pronounced changes in activities of terminal oxidases were discovered in conducting bundles of wild-grown hogweed plants exposed to long-term natural drought. It is supposed that the suppression of cytochrome-mediated oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the cells of sugar beet source leaves impedes the translocation of assimilates and their accumulation in the taproot, which represents an important factor of drastic decrease in the yield of this agricultural crop under conditions of water deficit. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Effect of water deficit on respiration of conducting bundles in leaf petioles of sugar beet

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Publisher
Nauka/Interperiodica
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Physiology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1021443707030065
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Isolated fibrovascular bundles from source leaf petioles of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) and hog-weed (Heracleum sosnovskyi L.) were used to study the influence of long-term drought on the oxygen uptake rate and activities of mitochondrial oxidases, i.e., cytochrome oxidase and salicylhydroxamic acid-sensitive alternative oxidase (AO). Under normal soil moisture content (70% of full water-retaining capacity, WRC), the oxygen uptake by sugar beet conducting bundles was characterized by a high rate (> 700 μl O2/(g fr wt h)) and by distinct cytochrome oxidase-dependent manner of terminal oxidation (up to 80% inhibition of respiration in the presence of 0.5 mM KCN). After long-term water deficit (40% of WRC), the bundle respiration proceeded at nearly the same rate but featured an elevated resistance to cyanide. At early drought stage (10 days), a decrease in the activity of cytochrome-mediated oxidation pathway was largely counterbalanced by activation of mitochondrial AO, whereas long-term dehydration of plants was accompanied by activation of additional oxidative systems insensitive to both KCN and SHAM. Similar but even more pronounced changes in activities of terminal oxidases were discovered in conducting bundles of wild-grown hogweed plants exposed to long-term natural drought. It is supposed that the suppression of cytochrome-mediated oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the cells of sugar beet source leaves impedes the translocation of assimilates and their accumulation in the taproot, which represents an important factor of drastic decrease in the yield of this agricultural crop under conditions of water deficit.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: May 25, 2007

References

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