Effect of Tween Emulsifiers on the Shear Stability of Partially Crystalline Oil-in-Water Emulsions Stabilized By Sodium Caseinate

Effect of Tween Emulsifiers on the Shear Stability of Partially Crystalline Oil-in-Water... We investigated the effects of Tween emulsifier fatty acid chain length on the shear stability and crystallization behavior of 35 wt% partially crystalline oil-in-water emulsions prepared with and without 1 wt% sodium caseinate. Emulsions containing sodium caseinate and Tween 20, 40, 60 or 80 varied in shear stability, degree of supercooling and crystallization behavior depending on the type and concentration of Tween as well as the presence of protein. Generally, emulsions containing the unsaturated emulsifier Tween 80 were the most shear sensitive followed by the saturated emulsifiers Tween 20, 40 and 60 in order of increasing fatty acid chain length. Long chain saturated Tween emulsifiers (40 and 60) improved shear stability regardless of whether sodium caseinate was present indicating that alone, these emulsifiers form more robust interfacial films compared to the saturated short chain length Tween 20 and Tween 80. In emulsions prepared with sodium caseinate, the degree of supercooling decreased and the crystallization rate diminished with increasing saturated fatty acid chain length but only negligible changes were found without sodium caseinate. Together, these findings indicate that long chain saturated Tween emulsifiers provide better emulsion stability regardless of the presence of sodium caseinate but with sodium caseinate, stability may also be affected by changes to fat crystallization. These novel findings provide guidance on how combinations of proteins and emulsifiers can be used to modify and control the stability of partially crystalline oil-in-water emulsions through their combined effects on the properties of the interfacial film and fat crystallization. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food Biophysics Springer Journals

Effect of Tween Emulsifiers on the Shear Stability of Partially Crystalline Oil-in-Water Emulsions Stabilized By Sodium Caseinate

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Chemistry; Food Science; Biological and Medical Physics, Biophysics; Analytical Chemistry
ISSN
1557-1858
eISSN
1557-1866
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11483-017-9514-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We investigated the effects of Tween emulsifier fatty acid chain length on the shear stability and crystallization behavior of 35 wt% partially crystalline oil-in-water emulsions prepared with and without 1 wt% sodium caseinate. Emulsions containing sodium caseinate and Tween 20, 40, 60 or 80 varied in shear stability, degree of supercooling and crystallization behavior depending on the type and concentration of Tween as well as the presence of protein. Generally, emulsions containing the unsaturated emulsifier Tween 80 were the most shear sensitive followed by the saturated emulsifiers Tween 20, 40 and 60 in order of increasing fatty acid chain length. Long chain saturated Tween emulsifiers (40 and 60) improved shear stability regardless of whether sodium caseinate was present indicating that alone, these emulsifiers form more robust interfacial films compared to the saturated short chain length Tween 20 and Tween 80. In emulsions prepared with sodium caseinate, the degree of supercooling decreased and the crystallization rate diminished with increasing saturated fatty acid chain length but only negligible changes were found without sodium caseinate. Together, these findings indicate that long chain saturated Tween emulsifiers provide better emulsion stability regardless of the presence of sodium caseinate but with sodium caseinate, stability may also be affected by changes to fat crystallization. These novel findings provide guidance on how combinations of proteins and emulsifiers can be used to modify and control the stability of partially crystalline oil-in-water emulsions through their combined effects on the properties of the interfacial film and fat crystallization.

Journal

Food BiophysicsSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 9, 2018

References

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