Effect of Temperature and Illumination on Growth and Reproduction of the Green Alga Ulva fenestrata

Effect of Temperature and Illumination on Growth and Reproduction of the Green Alga Ulva fenestrata The combined effect of temperature (5, 10, 15, and 20°C) and illumination (40 and 60 mE/(m2 s)) on growth and reproduction of the green marine alga Ulva fenestrata P. et R. from the sublittoral zone of Amursky Bay, Sea of Japan, was studied in the laboratory environment in the months April–July, 2000. It was demonstrated that the temperature of 5°C and illumination of 40 mE/(m2 s) are the most favorable for maintaining the vegetative mass of the algae. A water temperature of 10°C and illumination of 40 mE/(m2 s) are the optimum conditions for vegetative growth of U. fenestrata thalli. A temperature decrease and increase by 5°C reduces the growth rate on average by 30%. Sporo- and gametogenesis in U. fenestrata are the most regular (every 10 days) and occupy the greatest disk area at a water temperature of 15°C and illumination of 40 mE/(m2 s). Vegetative growth of thalli is sharply inhibited at the stage of cell preparation to gametogenesis a day before the beginning of gamete formation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Marine Biology Springer Journals

Effect of Temperature and Illumination on Growth and Reproduction of the Green Alga Ulva fenestrata

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology
ISSN
1063-0740
eISSN
1608-3377
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1026361627982
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The combined effect of temperature (5, 10, 15, and 20°C) and illumination (40 and 60 mE/(m2 s)) on growth and reproduction of the green marine alga Ulva fenestrata P. et R. from the sublittoral zone of Amursky Bay, Sea of Japan, was studied in the laboratory environment in the months April–July, 2000. It was demonstrated that the temperature of 5°C and illumination of 40 mE/(m2 s) are the most favorable for maintaining the vegetative mass of the algae. A water temperature of 10°C and illumination of 40 mE/(m2 s) are the optimum conditions for vegetative growth of U. fenestrata thalli. A temperature decrease and increase by 5°C reduces the growth rate on average by 30%. Sporo- and gametogenesis in U. fenestrata are the most regular (every 10 days) and occupy the greatest disk area at a water temperature of 15°C and illumination of 40 mE/(m2 s). Vegetative growth of thalli is sharply inhibited at the stage of cell preparation to gametogenesis a day before the beginning of gamete formation.

Journal

Russian Journal of Marine BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 12, 2004

References

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