Effect of Light Quality on Nitrogen Metabolism of Radish Plants

Effect of Light Quality on Nitrogen Metabolism of Radish Plants The long-term action of blue or red light on nitrogen metabolism was studied in radish (Raphanus sativus L.) plants. The potential activity of nitrate reductase (NR) in vivo and its maximum activity in vitro, the content of soluble protein and free amino acids were determined in the course of the growth of a third leaf of radish plants. The effect of light quality on NR activity was found to depend significantly on the stage of leaf development. Blue light (BL) stimulated NR activity in leaves, when their areas were about 11–13% of the fully developed leaves. The efficiency of red light (RL) was significantly lower, because the maximum NR activity was observed in the leaves developed to the stage, when their areas were 38–40% of the final one. The comparative analysis of the pool of free amino acids in expanding leaves of BL- or RL-grown plants revealed significant changes in the contents of individual amino acids. Despite a higher accumulation of two amino acids in the leaves of BL-grown plants, namely, Asp (27% as compared to 13–16% in the RL-grown leaves) and Gly (5% against 2.5% in RL-grown leaves), the BL-grown leaves also demonstrated a significant decrease in Ala (10% as compared to 23% in the RL-grown leaves) and some decrease in the amounts of Ser and Gly. The content of soluble protein in a juvenile BL-grown leaf was observed to decrease gradually during leaf development. However, the protein content in the BL-grown leaf was always higher than in the RL-grown leaf of the same age. We concluded that the photoregulatory action of BL on NR activity determined the different rates of nitrogen assimilation in BL- and RL-grown plants. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Effect of Light Quality on Nitrogen Metabolism of Radish Plants

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Publisher
Nauka/Interperiodica
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences; Plant Physiology
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11183-005-0046-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The long-term action of blue or red light on nitrogen metabolism was studied in radish (Raphanus sativus L.) plants. The potential activity of nitrate reductase (NR) in vivo and its maximum activity in vitro, the content of soluble protein and free amino acids were determined in the course of the growth of a third leaf of radish plants. The effect of light quality on NR activity was found to depend significantly on the stage of leaf development. Blue light (BL) stimulated NR activity in leaves, when their areas were about 11–13% of the fully developed leaves. The efficiency of red light (RL) was significantly lower, because the maximum NR activity was observed in the leaves developed to the stage, when their areas were 38–40% of the final one. The comparative analysis of the pool of free amino acids in expanding leaves of BL- or RL-grown plants revealed significant changes in the contents of individual amino acids. Despite a higher accumulation of two amino acids in the leaves of BL-grown plants, namely, Asp (27% as compared to 13–16% in the RL-grown leaves) and Gly (5% against 2.5% in RL-grown leaves), the BL-grown leaves also demonstrated a significant decrease in Ala (10% as compared to 23% in the RL-grown leaves) and some decrease in the amounts of Ser and Gly. The content of soluble protein in a juvenile BL-grown leaf was observed to decrease gradually during leaf development. However, the protein content in the BL-grown leaf was always higher than in the RL-grown leaf of the same age. We concluded that the photoregulatory action of BL on NR activity determined the different rates of nitrogen assimilation in BL- and RL-grown plants.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: May 19, 2005

References

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