Effect of hydration status on pesticide uptake in anurans following exposure to contaminated soils

Effect of hydration status on pesticide uptake in anurans following exposure to contaminated soils In this study, the impact of hydration status on dermal uptake of pesticides in two species of amphibians is examined. Absorption of pesticides in anurans occurs primarily through a highly vascularized dermal seat patch; however, pesticides can also enter through the superficial dermis following exposure. Despite the growing body of literature on dermal exposure in amphibians, little is known on how hydration status influences uptake. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the influence of hydration status on absorption of pesticides (atrazine, triadimefon, metolachlor, chlorothalonil, and imidacloprid) in southern leopard frogs (Lithobates sphenocephala) and Fowler’s toads (Anaxyrus fowleri). Amphibian treatments included dehydration periods of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 h prior to exposure to pesticide-contaminated soils for 8 h. Following exposure, soil and whole-body homogenates were extracted and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Dehydration time was then regressed against post-exposure concentrations to infer the impact of dehydration on dermal pesticide uptake. Increased dehydration time resulted in significantly lowered pesticide concentrations in both species (F6, 293 = 67.66, p = 0.007) for the five pesticides studied. This phenomenon could be due to an energy and/or dilution effect. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Science and Pollution Research Springer Journals

Effect of hydration status on pesticide uptake in anurans following exposure to contaminated soils

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by This is a U.S. Government work and not under copyright protection in the US; foreign copyright protection may apply
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Environmental Chemistry; Ecotoxicology; Environmental Health; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution
ISSN
0944-1344
eISSN
1614-7499
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11356-018-1830-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this study, the impact of hydration status on dermal uptake of pesticides in two species of amphibians is examined. Absorption of pesticides in anurans occurs primarily through a highly vascularized dermal seat patch; however, pesticides can also enter through the superficial dermis following exposure. Despite the growing body of literature on dermal exposure in amphibians, little is known on how hydration status influences uptake. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the influence of hydration status on absorption of pesticides (atrazine, triadimefon, metolachlor, chlorothalonil, and imidacloprid) in southern leopard frogs (Lithobates sphenocephala) and Fowler’s toads (Anaxyrus fowleri). Amphibian treatments included dehydration periods of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 h prior to exposure to pesticide-contaminated soils for 8 h. Following exposure, soil and whole-body homogenates were extracted and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Dehydration time was then regressed against post-exposure concentrations to infer the impact of dehydration on dermal pesticide uptake. Increased dehydration time resulted in significantly lowered pesticide concentrations in both species (F6, 293 = 67.66, p = 0.007) for the five pesticides studied. This phenomenon could be due to an energy and/or dilution effect.

Journal

Environmental Science and Pollution ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 29, 2018

References

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