Effect of anthropogenic transformation of forest landscapes on populations of small insectivores in eastern Fennoscandia

Effect of anthropogenic transformation of forest landscapes on populations of small insectivores... Responses of small insectivores (Sorex L.) to clear felling and formation of an anthropogenic landscape have been studied and found to be ambiguous. Under such conditions, the total population density of the common shrew (S. araneus) increases, but its populations become unstable and sharply fluctuate seasonally and from year to year. The abundance of the Laxmann’s shrew (S. caecutiens) in transformed habitats becomes slightly lower, but its populations acquire certain additional stability. In general, this species negatively responds to felling but nevertheless regularly occurs in young secondary conifer stands. Finally, low-abundance species are either highly tolerant of forest exploitation (the Eurasian least shrew, S. minutissimus) or, on the contrary, show a distinctly negative response to felling in conifer forests (the taiga shrew, (S. isodon). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Ecology Springer Journals

Effect of anthropogenic transformation of forest landscapes on populations of small insectivores in eastern Fennoscandia

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Publisher
Pleiades Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Environment, general
ISSN
1067-4136
eISSN
1608-3334
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1067413615020046
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Responses of small insectivores (Sorex L.) to clear felling and formation of an anthropogenic landscape have been studied and found to be ambiguous. Under such conditions, the total population density of the common shrew (S. araneus) increases, but its populations become unstable and sharply fluctuate seasonally and from year to year. The abundance of the Laxmann’s shrew (S. caecutiens) in transformed habitats becomes slightly lower, but its populations acquire certain additional stability. In general, this species negatively responds to felling but nevertheless regularly occurs in young secondary conifer stands. Finally, low-abundance species are either highly tolerant of forest exploitation (the Eurasian least shrew, S. minutissimus) or, on the contrary, show a distinctly negative response to felling in conifer forests (the taiga shrew, (S. isodon).

Journal

Russian Journal of EcologySpringer Journals

Published: May 28, 2015

References

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