Effect of ABA on the UV-B-Induced Ethylene Evolution by the etr and ctr Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana

Effect of ABA on the UV-B-Induced Ethylene Evolution by the etr and ctr Mutants of Arabidopsis... The responses of 14-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. plants to UV-B irradiation (280–320 nm) and ABA treatment were investigated. Wild-type plants as well as ethylene-insensitive etr1-1 and ctr1-1 mutants were used. Theetr1-1 mutant considerably differed from the ctr1-1 one in the fresh weight production after UV-B treatment (29.5 kJ/m2). The irradiated etr1-1 plants fell well behind the nonirradiated ones during the first two days after stress, but by the 8th day, their weight attained 70% of control plant weight. In contrast, Ctr1-1 mutant weight comprised 70% of control level after two days of stress but, by the 8th day, it was only 56% of the weight of control plants. In wild-type and ctr1-1 plants, ABA, in the 8 × 10–6 to 2 × 10–4 M concentration range, increased the difference between the weights of nonirradiated and irradiated plants, but in etr1-1 plants, ABA decreased this difference. The etr1-1, ctr1-1, and wild-type plants were very similar in the dynamics of ethylene evolution after UV-B treatment (7.4 kJ/m2). In wild-type, etr1-1, and ctr1-1 plants, ABA, in a concentration-dependent manner, inhibited UV-B-induced ethylene evolution to the same extent. The results obtained show that ABA exerted an opposite effect on UV-B-dependent growth in the plants with active (wild type and ctr1-1) and blocked (etr1-1) ethylene signal pathway, whereas the inhibition of ethylene synthesis by ABA was not related to ethylene signal transmission. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Effect of ABA on the UV-B-Induced Ethylene Evolution by the etr and ctr Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1023/B:RUPP.0000040754.15596.32
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The responses of 14-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. plants to UV-B irradiation (280–320 nm) and ABA treatment were investigated. Wild-type plants as well as ethylene-insensitive etr1-1 and ctr1-1 mutants were used. Theetr1-1 mutant considerably differed from the ctr1-1 one in the fresh weight production after UV-B treatment (29.5 kJ/m2). The irradiated etr1-1 plants fell well behind the nonirradiated ones during the first two days after stress, but by the 8th day, their weight attained 70% of control plant weight. In contrast, Ctr1-1 mutant weight comprised 70% of control level after two days of stress but, by the 8th day, it was only 56% of the weight of control plants. In wild-type and ctr1-1 plants, ABA, in the 8 × 10–6 to 2 × 10–4 M concentration range, increased the difference between the weights of nonirradiated and irradiated plants, but in etr1-1 plants, ABA decreased this difference. The etr1-1, ctr1-1, and wild-type plants were very similar in the dynamics of ethylene evolution after UV-B treatment (7.4 kJ/m2). In wild-type, etr1-1, and ctr1-1 plants, ABA, in a concentration-dependent manner, inhibited UV-B-induced ethylene evolution to the same extent. The results obtained show that ABA exerted an opposite effect on UV-B-dependent growth in the plants with active (wild type and ctr1-1) and blocked (etr1-1) ethylene signal pathway, whereas the inhibition of ethylene synthesis by ABA was not related to ethylene signal transmission.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 22, 2004

References

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