Editors introduction: biobanks as sites of bio-objectification

Editors introduction: biobanks as sites of bio-objectification Stephens et al. Life Sciences, Society and Policy (2018) 14:6 https://doi.org/10.1186/s40504-018-0070-5 EDITORIAL Open Access Editors introduction: biobanks as sites of bio-objectification 1* 2 3 Neil Stephens , Nik Brown and Conor Douglas Biobanks and biorepositories have become increasingly important and prevalent since * Correspondence: Neil.Stephens@Brunel.ac.uk the 1990s as holders and distributors of biological material. They exhibit significant Brunel University London, London, UK diversity in form and function, from the very small to the very large, from the very Full list of author information is specialised to the much more generic, holding collections of diseased and healthy available at the end of the article resources, from human, animal and plant, and span private, public and third sectors. They also operate as key mediators in relationships between patients, researchers, reg- ulators and companies as they hold and distribute tissue, data and social credibility. Furthermore, they remain active sites in the mediation of controversy, sometimes caus- ing controversy, sometimes closing controversy. In doing, they become important nodal points of regulatory practice (Douglas et al. 2012; Hansen and Metzler 2012). Their proliferation has resulted in new and dynamic ethical and policy issues in need of critical engagement, some of which are addressed in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Life Sciences, Society and Policy Springer Journals

Editors introduction: biobanks as sites of bio-objectification

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by The Author(s).
Subject
Philosophy; Philosophy, general; Life Sciences, general; Theory of Medicine/Bioethics; Social Sciences, general; Biomedicine, general; Ethics
eISSN
2195-7819
D.O.I.
10.1186/s40504-018-0070-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Stephens et al. Life Sciences, Society and Policy (2018) 14:6 https://doi.org/10.1186/s40504-018-0070-5 EDITORIAL Open Access Editors introduction: biobanks as sites of bio-objectification 1* 2 3 Neil Stephens , Nik Brown and Conor Douglas Biobanks and biorepositories have become increasingly important and prevalent since * Correspondence: Neil.Stephens@Brunel.ac.uk the 1990s as holders and distributors of biological material. They exhibit significant Brunel University London, London, UK diversity in form and function, from the very small to the very large, from the very Full list of author information is specialised to the much more generic, holding collections of diseased and healthy available at the end of the article resources, from human, animal and plant, and span private, public and third sectors. They also operate as key mediators in relationships between patients, researchers, reg- ulators and companies as they hold and distribute tissue, data and social credibility. Furthermore, they remain active sites in the mediation of controversy, sometimes caus- ing controversy, sometimes closing controversy. In doing, they become important nodal points of regulatory practice (Douglas et al. 2012; Hansen and Metzler 2012). Their proliferation has resulted in new and dynamic ethical and policy issues in need of critical engagement, some of which are addressed in

Journal

Life Sciences, Society and PolicySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 21, 2018

References

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