Editing of accD and ndhF chloroplast transcripts is partially affected in the Arabidopsis vanilla cream1 mutant

Editing of accD and ndhF chloroplast transcripts is partially affected in the Arabidopsis vanilla... The vanilla cream1 (vac1) albino mutant is defective in a gene encoding a chloroplast-localized pentatricopeptide repeat protein of the DYW subgroup. However, the carboxyl-terminal DYW motif is truncated in VAC1. To identify vac1-specific phenotypes, we compared 34 chloroplast RNA editing sites and ~90 chloroplast gene expression patterns among wild type, vac1 and another albino mutant ispH, which is defective in the plastid isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway. We found that the editing of accD and ndhF transcripts is partially affected in vac1. In addition, steady-state levels of chloroplast rRNAs are significantly decreased in vac1. The expression of plastid-encoded RNA polymerase transcribed genes is down-regulated, whereas the expression of nucleus-encoded RNA polymerase transcribed genes is up-regulated in vac1. Although the development and function of mutant chloroplasts are severely impaired, steady-state mRNA levels of nucleus-encoded photosynthetic genes are not affected or are only slightly decreased in vac1. The ZAT10 gene encodes a transcription factor and its expression is down-regulated by norflurazon treatment in wild type. This norflurazon effect was not observed in vac1. These results suggest that the VAC1 protein may be involved in plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signaling in addition to its role in chloroplast RNA editing and gene expression. A defect in a key biosynthetic pathway can have many indirect effects on chloroplast gene expression as is seen in the ispH mutant. Similarly, the vac1 mutant has pleiotropic molecular phenotypes and most of which may be indirect effects. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Editing of accD and ndhF chloroplast transcripts is partially affected in the Arabidopsis vanilla cream1 mutant

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/editing-of-accd-and-ndhf-chloroplast-transcripts-is-partially-affected-3pA1nXfRyE
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Pathology; Biochemistry, general; Plant Sciences
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11103-010-9616-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The vanilla cream1 (vac1) albino mutant is defective in a gene encoding a chloroplast-localized pentatricopeptide repeat protein of the DYW subgroup. However, the carboxyl-terminal DYW motif is truncated in VAC1. To identify vac1-specific phenotypes, we compared 34 chloroplast RNA editing sites and ~90 chloroplast gene expression patterns among wild type, vac1 and another albino mutant ispH, which is defective in the plastid isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway. We found that the editing of accD and ndhF transcripts is partially affected in vac1. In addition, steady-state levels of chloroplast rRNAs are significantly decreased in vac1. The expression of plastid-encoded RNA polymerase transcribed genes is down-regulated, whereas the expression of nucleus-encoded RNA polymerase transcribed genes is up-regulated in vac1. Although the development and function of mutant chloroplasts are severely impaired, steady-state mRNA levels of nucleus-encoded photosynthetic genes are not affected or are only slightly decreased in vac1. The ZAT10 gene encodes a transcription factor and its expression is down-regulated by norflurazon treatment in wild type. This norflurazon effect was not observed in vac1. These results suggest that the VAC1 protein may be involved in plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signaling in addition to its role in chloroplast RNA editing and gene expression. A defect in a key biosynthetic pathway can have many indirect effects on chloroplast gene expression as is seen in the ispH mutant. Similarly, the vac1 mutant has pleiotropic molecular phenotypes and most of which may be indirect effects.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 9, 2010

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off