Ecophysiological response of Jania rubens (Corallinaceae) to ocean acidification

Ecophysiological response of Jania rubens (Corallinaceae) to ocean acidification Coralline algae (Rhodophyta) play a key role in promoting settlement of other benthic organisms, being the food source for herbivores, being involved in the stabilization of reef networks, and in carbonate production. They are considered a vulner- able group to ocean acidification due to the potential dissolution of their high-Mg calcite skeleton at lower pH. Nevertheless, different species of coralline algae showed different responses to low-pH/high-pCO environment. Here, we studied the physiological response of Jania rubens to the pH condition predicted for the year 2100. We used a natural C O vent system as natural laboratory to transplant J. rubens from pH 8.1–7.5 for 3 weeks. Maximal PSII photochemical efficiency showed a significant reduction in transplanted thalli at low pH (7.5-T) compared to other conditions; consistent with that result, also the pigments involved in the light-harvesting spectrum of J. rubens (i.e., chlorophylls, carotenoids, and phycobilins), exhib- ited a significant decrease under water acidification, highlighting the strong sensitivity of this species to the environmental change. A major understanding of the response of coralline algae at high CO will go through the impact of OA on benthic ecosystems in the next future. This contribution is the written, peer-reviewed version of a paper http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rendiconti Lincei Springer Journals

Ecophysiological response of Jania rubens (Corallinaceae) to ocean acidification

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Earth Sciences, general; Life Sciences, general; Biomedicine, general; History of Science
ISSN
2037-4631
eISSN
1720-0776
D.O.I.
10.1007/s12210-018-0719-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Coralline algae (Rhodophyta) play a key role in promoting settlement of other benthic organisms, being the food source for herbivores, being involved in the stabilization of reef networks, and in carbonate production. They are considered a vulner- able group to ocean acidification due to the potential dissolution of their high-Mg calcite skeleton at lower pH. Nevertheless, different species of coralline algae showed different responses to low-pH/high-pCO environment. Here, we studied the physiological response of Jania rubens to the pH condition predicted for the year 2100. We used a natural C O vent system as natural laboratory to transplant J. rubens from pH 8.1–7.5 for 3 weeks. Maximal PSII photochemical efficiency showed a significant reduction in transplanted thalli at low pH (7.5-T) compared to other conditions; consistent with that result, also the pigments involved in the light-harvesting spectrum of J. rubens (i.e., chlorophylls, carotenoids, and phycobilins), exhib- ited a significant decrease under water acidification, highlighting the strong sensitivity of this species to the environmental change. A major understanding of the response of coralline algae at high CO will go through the impact of OA on benthic ecosystems in the next future. This contribution is the written, peer-reviewed version of a paper

Journal

Rendiconti LinceiSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 2, 2018

References

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