Economic impact of MMR vaccine hesitancy in the US

Economic impact of MMR vaccine hesitancy in the US PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News 784, p15 - 12 Aug 2017 Economic impact of MMR vaccine hesitancy in the US Minor reductions in measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine coverage in US children due to vaccine hesitancy would be associated with significant public health and economic consequences, according to a study published in JAMA Pediatrics. The authors investigated the potential economic implications and effects on public health of vaccine hesitancy, the delay or refusal of vaccination due to personal beliefs. Publicly available data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was used to simulate vaccination coverage for the MMR vaccine in US children aged 2 to 11 years. A stochastic model modified for transmission of infectious diseases was used to estimate outbreak size relative to vaccine coverage, with model prediction validation undertaken against an independent data set from England and Wales. Using available literature, an estimated cost of $US20 000 per case of measles was applied from a public sector perspective using US 2016 dollar values. The study found that a 5% decrease in MMR vaccine coverage would be associated with a 3-fold increase in measles cases in US children aged 2–11 years, with additional economic costs to the public sector of $2.1 million. The authors estimated that eliminating nonmedical exemptions could potentially increase the national MMR vaccine coverage from the baseline prevalence of 93% to 95%, which would result in a 20% reduction in annual measles cases. Although some variation existed around these estimates due to the stochastic elements of measles importation, the correlation was robust between decreasing MMR vaccine coverage and increasing numbers of measles cases. The authors concluded that the results "directly confront the notion that measles is no longer a threat in the United States" and "should play a key role in any policies adapted by state or national governments that relate to childhood vaccination". Lo NC, et al. Public Health and Economic Consequences of Vaccine Hesitancy for Measles in the United States. JAMA Pediatrics : 24 Jul 2017. Available from: URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.1695 803261499 1173-5503/17/0784-0001/$14.95 Adis © 2017 Springer International Publishing AG. All rights reserved PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News 12 Aug 2017 No. 784 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News Springer Journals

Economic impact of MMR vaccine hesitancy in the US

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer International Publishing AG
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Pharmacoeconomics and Health Outcomes; Quality of Life Research; Health Economics; Public Health
ISSN
1173-5503
eISSN
1179-2043
D.O.I.
10.1007/s40274-017-4226-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News 784, p15 - 12 Aug 2017 Economic impact of MMR vaccine hesitancy in the US Minor reductions in measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine coverage in US children due to vaccine hesitancy would be associated with significant public health and economic consequences, according to a study published in JAMA Pediatrics. The authors investigated the potential economic implications and effects on public health of vaccine hesitancy, the delay or refusal of vaccination due to personal beliefs. Publicly available data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was used to simulate vaccination coverage for the MMR vaccine in US children aged 2 to 11 years. A stochastic model modified for transmission of infectious diseases was used to estimate outbreak size relative to vaccine coverage, with model prediction validation undertaken against an independent data set from England and Wales. Using available literature, an estimated cost of $US20 000 per case of measles was applied from a public sector perspective using US 2016 dollar values. The study found that a 5% decrease in MMR vaccine coverage would be associated with a 3-fold increase in measles cases in US children aged 2–11 years, with additional economic costs to the public sector of $2.1 million. The authors estimated that eliminating nonmedical exemptions could potentially increase the national MMR vaccine coverage from the baseline prevalence of 93% to 95%, which would result in a 20% reduction in annual measles cases. Although some variation existed around these estimates due to the stochastic elements of measles importation, the correlation was robust between decreasing MMR vaccine coverage and increasing numbers of measles cases. The authors concluded that the results "directly confront the notion that measles is no longer a threat in the United States" and "should play a key role in any policies adapted by state or national governments that relate to childhood vaccination". Lo NC, et al. Public Health and Economic Consequences of Vaccine Hesitancy for Measles in the United States. JAMA Pediatrics : 24 Jul 2017. Available from: URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.1695 803261499 1173-5503/17/0784-0001/$14.95 Adis © 2017 Springer International Publishing AG. All rights reserved PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News 12 Aug 2017 No. 784

Journal

PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes NewsSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 12, 2017

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