Economic Abuse Experiences and Depressive Symptoms among Victims of Intimate Partner Violence

Economic Abuse Experiences and Depressive Symptoms among Victims of Intimate Partner Violence There are significant, detrimental effects of physical, sexual, and psychological intimate partner violence (IPV) on victims’ mental health and well-being. However, little is known about the impact of economic abuse. To address this gap, the purpose of this study was to examine the association between economic abuse and depression and to explore whether the association between economic abuse and depression could be accounted for by other forms of IPV victimization (physical, sexual, and psychological abuse). Data from 457 female victims of IPV, recruited from 14 domestic violence programs across 10 states and Puerto Rico, were examined to explore the association between economic abuse and depressive symptoms. A series of hierarchical regressions were used to examine whether the addition of economic abuse improved the association between depression over and above participants’ sociodemographic characteristics and experiences of psychological, physical, and sexual IPV. The majority (93%) of participants reported experiencing economic abuse from their intimate partner. The findings from a series of multiple regression analyses revealed that economic abuse was uniquely associated with depression after accounting for other forms of IPV victimization and the sociodemographic characteristics of the participants. Implications include the need for screening, intervention, and prevention of economic abuse among IPV victims and continued research regarding economic abuse experiences. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Family Violence Springer Journals

Economic Abuse Experiences and Depressive Symptoms among Victims of Intimate Partner Violence

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Quality of Life Research; Clinical Psychology; Law and Psychology; Criminology and Criminal Justice, general; Psychotherapy and Counseling
ISSN
0885-7482
eISSN
1573-2851
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10896-018-9973-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There are significant, detrimental effects of physical, sexual, and psychological intimate partner violence (IPV) on victims’ mental health and well-being. However, little is known about the impact of economic abuse. To address this gap, the purpose of this study was to examine the association between economic abuse and depression and to explore whether the association between economic abuse and depression could be accounted for by other forms of IPV victimization (physical, sexual, and psychological abuse). Data from 457 female victims of IPV, recruited from 14 domestic violence programs across 10 states and Puerto Rico, were examined to explore the association between economic abuse and depressive symptoms. A series of hierarchical regressions were used to examine whether the addition of economic abuse improved the association between depression over and above participants’ sociodemographic characteristics and experiences of psychological, physical, and sexual IPV. The majority (93%) of participants reported experiencing economic abuse from their intimate partner. The findings from a series of multiple regression analyses revealed that economic abuse was uniquely associated with depression after accounting for other forms of IPV victimization and the sociodemographic characteristics of the participants. Implications include the need for screening, intervention, and prevention of economic abuse among IPV victims and continued research regarding economic abuse experiences.

Journal

Journal of Family ViolenceSpringer Journals

Published: May 30, 2018

References

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