Ecological responses to forest age, habitat, and host vary by mycorrhizal type in boreal peatlands

Ecological responses to forest age, habitat, and host vary by mycorrhizal type in boreal peatlands Despite covering vast areas of boreal North America, the ecological factors structuring mycorrhizal fungal communities in peatland forests are relatively poorly understood. To assess how these communities vary by age (younger vs. mature), habitat (fen vs. bog), and host (conifer trees vs. ericaceous shrub), we sampled the roots of two canopy trees (Larix laricina and Picea mariana) and an ericaceous shrub (Ledum groenlandicum) at four sites in northern Minnesota, USA. To characterize the specific influence of host co-occurrence on mycorrhizal fungal community structure, we also conducted a greenhouse bioassay using the same three hosts. Root samples were assessed using Illumina-based high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of the ITS1 rRNA gene region. As expected, we found that the relative abundance of ectomycorrhizal fungi was high on both Larix and Picea, whereas ericoid mycorrhizal fungi had high relative abundance only on Ledum. Ericoid mycorrhizal fungal richness was significantly higher in mature forests, in bogs, and on Ledum hosts, while ectomycorrhizal fungal richness did not differ significantly across any of these three variables. In terms of community composition, ericoid mycorrhizal fungi were more strongly influenced by host while ectomycorrhizal fungi were more influenced by habitat. In the greenhouse bioassay, the presence of Ledum had consistently stronger effects on the composition of ectomycorrhizal, ericoid, and ericoid-ectomycorrhizal fungal communities than either Larix or Picea. Collectively, these results suggest that partitioning HTS-based datasets by mycorrhizal type in boreal peatland forests is important, as their responses to rapidly changing environmental conditions are not likely to be uniform. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mycorrhiza Springer Journals

Ecological responses to forest age, habitat, and host vary by mycorrhizal type in boreal peatlands

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/ecological-responses-to-forest-age-habitat-and-host-vary-by-R9FrES1x5H
Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Microbiology; Plant Sciences; Ecology; Agriculture; Forestry
ISSN
0940-6360
eISSN
1432-1890
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00572-018-0821-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Despite covering vast areas of boreal North America, the ecological factors structuring mycorrhizal fungal communities in peatland forests are relatively poorly understood. To assess how these communities vary by age (younger vs. mature), habitat (fen vs. bog), and host (conifer trees vs. ericaceous shrub), we sampled the roots of two canopy trees (Larix laricina and Picea mariana) and an ericaceous shrub (Ledum groenlandicum) at four sites in northern Minnesota, USA. To characterize the specific influence of host co-occurrence on mycorrhizal fungal community structure, we also conducted a greenhouse bioassay using the same three hosts. Root samples were assessed using Illumina-based high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of the ITS1 rRNA gene region. As expected, we found that the relative abundance of ectomycorrhizal fungi was high on both Larix and Picea, whereas ericoid mycorrhizal fungi had high relative abundance only on Ledum. Ericoid mycorrhizal fungal richness was significantly higher in mature forests, in bogs, and on Ledum hosts, while ectomycorrhizal fungal richness did not differ significantly across any of these three variables. In terms of community composition, ericoid mycorrhizal fungi were more strongly influenced by host while ectomycorrhizal fungi were more influenced by habitat. In the greenhouse bioassay, the presence of Ledum had consistently stronger effects on the composition of ectomycorrhizal, ericoid, and ericoid-ectomycorrhizal fungal communities than either Larix or Picea. Collectively, these results suggest that partitioning HTS-based datasets by mycorrhizal type in boreal peatland forests is important, as their responses to rapidly changing environmental conditions are not likely to be uniform.

Journal

MycorrhizaSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 4, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off