Early-stage of invasion by beech bark disease does not necessarily trigger American beech root sucker establishment in hardwood stands

Early-stage of invasion by beech bark disease does not necessarily trigger American beech root... Two concomitant phenomena currently affect the dynamics of sugar maple-American beech (AB) stands in northeastern North America: beech bark disease (BBD), and increased AB understory density. Many studies suggest a causal link between the two phenomena, i.e., BBD favouring beech regeneration. But this link has yet to be experimentally demonstrated. To address the question, we compared regeneration composition between recently BBD-affected and -unaffected stands. A total of 109 stands were sampled; half were affected by BBD. Seedling and sapling density were assessed, together with the origin (seedling or sprout). While BBD affects stands in the eastern part of the study region, AB was observed in the understory across the entire region. No clear difference in AB sprout density between BBD-affected and -unaffected stands was observed while AB seedling density—as well as pooled AB seedling and sprout density were higher in unaffected stands. Findings suggests that BBD, in its early stage, is not a necessary trigger of AB understory establishment. Yet, AB sapling basal area generally was higher in stands affected by BBD, likely indicating a greater rate of AB understory development due to increased light availability beneath a more open crown canopy. That development can lead to AB understory dominance. This distinction—BBD not necessarily triggering AB root sucker establishment but favoring AB advance regeneration development—also questions the generalized perception that dense AB thickets necessarily originate from root suckers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Invasions Springer Journals

Early-stage of invasion by beech bark disease does not necessarily trigger American beech root sucker establishment in hardwood stands

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/early-stage-of-invasion-by-beech-bark-disease-does-not-necessarily-YZ8iI93Djf
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Plant Sciences; Developmental Biology
ISSN
1387-3547
eISSN
1573-1464
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10530-018-1771-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Two concomitant phenomena currently affect the dynamics of sugar maple-American beech (AB) stands in northeastern North America: beech bark disease (BBD), and increased AB understory density. Many studies suggest a causal link between the two phenomena, i.e., BBD favouring beech regeneration. But this link has yet to be experimentally demonstrated. To address the question, we compared regeneration composition between recently BBD-affected and -unaffected stands. A total of 109 stands were sampled; half were affected by BBD. Seedling and sapling density were assessed, together with the origin (seedling or sprout). While BBD affects stands in the eastern part of the study region, AB was observed in the understory across the entire region. No clear difference in AB sprout density between BBD-affected and -unaffected stands was observed while AB seedling density—as well as pooled AB seedling and sprout density were higher in unaffected stands. Findings suggests that BBD, in its early stage, is not a necessary trigger of AB understory establishment. Yet, AB sapling basal area generally was higher in stands affected by BBD, likely indicating a greater rate of AB understory development due to increased light availability beneath a more open crown canopy. That development can lead to AB understory dominance. This distinction—BBD not necessarily triggering AB root sucker establishment but favoring AB advance regeneration development—also questions the generalized perception that dense AB thickets necessarily originate from root suckers.

Journal

Biological InvasionsSpringer Journals

Published: May 31, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off