Early photosynthetic response of Arabidopsis thaliana to temperature and salt stress conditions

Early photosynthetic response of Arabidopsis thaliana to temperature and salt stress conditions Temperature changes and salt accumulation are among the most common abiotic factors affecting plants in agricultural and natural ecosystems. The different responses of plants to these factors have been widely investigated in previous works. However, detailed mechanism of the early photosynthetic response (first 24 h) has been poorly studied. The aim of the work was to monitor the early response of adult Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to different thermal (cold and heat) and salt conditions. Detailed evaluation of the efficiency of photosystem II was done, and the various routes of energy output as well as measurements of the contents of H2O2, proline, and photosynthetic pigments at different times during the first 24 h of treatment were examined. The conditions used in the study were those that caused a weak stress with time of exposure. Cold-treated plants showed the most continuous inhibitory effect on photosynthetic activity, with a fast metabolic slowdown (reduced PSII efficiency and decreased pigment contents), although they also demonstrated clear acclimation responses (increased heat dissipation and protein content). Heat-treated plants showed a late but stronger effect on photosynthesis with significantly increased quantum yield of nonregulated energy dissipation (ΨNO) and H2O2 content at the last measurements. Finally, salt-induced oxidative stress (increased H2O2 content), decreased PSII efficiency and pigment content. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Early photosynthetic response of Arabidopsis thaliana to temperature and salt stress conditions

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Physiology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1021443712030119
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Temperature changes and salt accumulation are among the most common abiotic factors affecting plants in agricultural and natural ecosystems. The different responses of plants to these factors have been widely investigated in previous works. However, detailed mechanism of the early photosynthetic response (first 24 h) has been poorly studied. The aim of the work was to monitor the early response of adult Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to different thermal (cold and heat) and salt conditions. Detailed evaluation of the efficiency of photosystem II was done, and the various routes of energy output as well as measurements of the contents of H2O2, proline, and photosynthetic pigments at different times during the first 24 h of treatment were examined. The conditions used in the study were those that caused a weak stress with time of exposure. Cold-treated plants showed the most continuous inhibitory effect on photosynthetic activity, with a fast metabolic slowdown (reduced PSII efficiency and decreased pigment contents), although they also demonstrated clear acclimation responses (increased heat dissipation and protein content). Heat-treated plants showed a late but stronger effect on photosynthesis with significantly increased quantum yield of nonregulated energy dissipation (ΨNO) and H2O2 content at the last measurements. Finally, salt-induced oxidative stress (increased H2O2 content), decreased PSII efficiency and pigment content.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 16, 2012

References

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