Early identification of trauma patients in need for emergent transfusion: results of a single-center retrospective study evaluating three scoring systems

Early identification of trauma patients in need for emergent transfusion: results of a... Background The Trauma-Induced Coagulopathy Clinical Score (TICCS) was developed to be calculable on the site of injury to discriminate between trauma patients with or without the need for damage control resuscitation and thus transfusion. This early alert could then be translated to in-hospital parameters at patient arrival. Base excess (BE) and ultrasound (FAST) are known to be predictive parameters for emergent transfusion. We emphasize that adding these two parameters to the TICCS could improve the scoring system predictability. Methods A retrospective study was conducted in the University Hospital of Liège. TICCS was calculated for every patient. BE and FAST results were recorded and points were added to the TICCS according to the TICCS.BE definition (+ 3 points if BE < − 5 and + 3 points in case of a positive FAST). Emergent transfusion was defined as the use of at least one blood product in the resuscitation room. The capacity of the TICCS, the TICCS.BE and the Trauma-Associated Severe Hemor- rhage (TASH) to predict emergent transfusion was assessed. Results A total of 328 patients were included. Among them, 14% needed emergent transfusion. The probability for emergent transfusion grows with the TICCS and the TICCS.BE values. We did not http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery Springer Journals

Early identification of trauma patients in need for emergent transfusion: results of a single-center retrospective study evaluating three scoring systems

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Traumatic Surgery; Surgical Orthopedics; Emergency Medicine; Sports Medicine; Intensive / Critical Care Medicine; Surgery
ISSN
1863-9933
eISSN
1863-9941
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00068-018-0965-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background The Trauma-Induced Coagulopathy Clinical Score (TICCS) was developed to be calculable on the site of injury to discriminate between trauma patients with or without the need for damage control resuscitation and thus transfusion. This early alert could then be translated to in-hospital parameters at patient arrival. Base excess (BE) and ultrasound (FAST) are known to be predictive parameters for emergent transfusion. We emphasize that adding these two parameters to the TICCS could improve the scoring system predictability. Methods A retrospective study was conducted in the University Hospital of Liège. TICCS was calculated for every patient. BE and FAST results were recorded and points were added to the TICCS according to the TICCS.BE definition (+ 3 points if BE < − 5 and + 3 points in case of a positive FAST). Emergent transfusion was defined as the use of at least one blood product in the resuscitation room. The capacity of the TICCS, the TICCS.BE and the Trauma-Associated Severe Hemor- rhage (TASH) to predict emergent transfusion was assessed. Results A total of 328 patients were included. Among them, 14% needed emergent transfusion. The probability for emergent transfusion grows with the TICCS and the TICCS.BE values. We did not

Journal

European Journal of Trauma and Emergency SurgerySpringer Journals

Published: May 31, 2018

References

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