Early hatch: a strategy for safe downstream larval transport in amphidromous gobies

Early hatch: a strategy for safe downstream larval transport in amphidromous gobies The downstream migration to sea of newly-hatched larvae of amphidromous fishes exposes them to the risk of irreversible starvation if migration takes too long. Some fishes, especially sicydiine gobies, exhibit early hatch of eggs, often less than 48 h after fertilisation, and the newly-hatched larvae are at a very early stage of ontogeny, with no functional mouth or fins, no functional eye, and little pigmentation in the eye or elsewhere. This may facilitate survival as it means that downstream migration takes place when plenty of yolk remains, minimising the risk of starvation. Additional behaviours, such as positive phototaxis, continual swimming up into the water column, and hatching during elevated river flows, may also have contributed to rapid downstream transport and survival. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

Early hatch: a strategy for safe downstream larval transport in amphidromous gobies

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/early-hatch-a-strategy-for-safe-downstream-larval-transport-in-rcL83Af4fT
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Life Sciences; Zoology ; Freshwater & Marine Ecology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11160-008-9085-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The downstream migration to sea of newly-hatched larvae of amphidromous fishes exposes them to the risk of irreversible starvation if migration takes too long. Some fishes, especially sicydiine gobies, exhibit early hatch of eggs, often less than 48 h after fertilisation, and the newly-hatched larvae are at a very early stage of ontogeny, with no functional mouth or fins, no functional eye, and little pigmentation in the eye or elsewhere. This may facilitate survival as it means that downstream migration takes place when plenty of yolk remains, minimising the risk of starvation. Additional behaviours, such as positive phototaxis, continual swimming up into the water column, and hatching during elevated river flows, may also have contributed to rapid downstream transport and survival.

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 16, 2008

References

  • Distribution of two sympatric amphidromous grazing fish Plecoglossus altivelis Temminck & Schlegel and Sicyopterus japonicus (Tanaka) along the course of a temperate river
    Abe, S; Yodo, T; Matsubara, N; Iguchi, K

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off