Early embryo orientation with respect to the cardinal points in natural clutches of two ranidae species inhabiting geographically distant regions

Early embryo orientation with respect to the cardinal points in natural clutches of two ranidae... The azimuth (the least angle with the north-south direction) of the first cleavage furrow and anteroposterior axes of neurula was measured on projections of photographs of natural clutches. The azimuth distribution of the craniocaudal axis ofRana dalmatina neurulae in clutches from southern Italy and the first cleavage furrows ofR. arvalis embryos in clutches from central Russia proved identical. Both craniocaudal axes and first cleavage furrows were mostly oriented from west to east. The azimuth distribution of the craniocaudal axis ofR. arvalis neurulae in clutches subjected to repeated cold shock proved to be random. The causes and mechanisms of predominant orientation of the embryos in natural clutches of frogs are discussed. We propose that magnetic sensitivity is acquired by cytoskeleton elements, most likely microtubules, during reorganization in the course of normal development or due to experimental influences. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Developmental Biology Springer Journals

Early embryo orientation with respect to the cardinal points in natural clutches of two ranidae species inhabiting geographically distant regions

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Publisher
Nauka/Interperiodica
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Life Sciences; Developmental Biology; Animal Anatomy / Morphology / Histology
ISSN
1062-3604
eISSN
1608-3326
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF02758909
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The azimuth (the least angle with the north-south direction) of the first cleavage furrow and anteroposterior axes of neurula was measured on projections of photographs of natural clutches. The azimuth distribution of the craniocaudal axis ofRana dalmatina neurulae in clutches from southern Italy and the first cleavage furrows ofR. arvalis embryos in clutches from central Russia proved identical. Both craniocaudal axes and first cleavage furrows were mostly oriented from west to east. The azimuth distribution of the craniocaudal axis ofR. arvalis neurulae in clutches subjected to repeated cold shock proved to be random. The causes and mechanisms of predominant orientation of the embryos in natural clutches of frogs are discussed. We propose that magnetic sensitivity is acquired by cytoskeleton elements, most likely microtubules, during reorganization in the course of normal development or due to experimental influences.

Journal

Russian Journal of Developmental BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Nov 18, 2007

References

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