Dynamics of growth, proliferation and differentiation of wheat root cells exposed to a high nickel concentration

Dynamics of growth, proliferation and differentiation of wheat root cells exposed to a high... The dynamics of root growth, proliferation of initial cells of the root cap, rhizodermis, and central metaxylem, as well as structural changes in the cells induced by a 72-h exposure to a high (0.1 mM) concentration of NiSO4 were studied in 3-day-old wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings. In the roots of control plants, we observed a 12-h rhythm of changes in the length of the cells that completed elongating. Upon the treatment with nickel, this effect was negated, and a considerable reduction in the root length increment was observed in 12 h. In 24 h, root growth essentially ceased. Cell elongation was suppressed acropetally, and the cells, whose elongation was over, became shorter. In the meristem and apical part of the elongation zone, slow cell growth continued during the second and even third days. Autoradiography showed that the earliest effect of nickel on the processes of root morphogenesis observed in 6 h was a suppression of cell transition to DNA synthesis. The cells, where DNA synthesis has already started or which were in other stages of the cycle, continued to pass slowly through the cycle and completed it. Sister cells formed as a result of division subsequently left the cycle in the phase G1 and transited to dormancy. It was found that the main mechanism of cell proliferation cessation was the suppression of cell transition to DNA synthesis. In the cells elongating when exposed to nickel, tissue-specific changes in the nucleus structure were observed (chromatolysis in the rhizodermis and cortex, pycnosis in the endodermis, a disturbance of the nucleus structure in the central metaxylem). These disorders were only observed after cessation of elongation. Root incubation in 0.1 mM nickel solution did not affect the onset of cell differentiation in the xylem and metaphloem and shifted its beginning to the root tip. However, in 24 h the initiation and growth of root hairs were suppressed. It was concluded that tissue-specific nickel-induced changes in the nucleus structure in the elongating cells do not cause the cessation of root growth, although point to nickel toxic effect on the cells in the course of elongation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Dynamics of growth, proliferation and differentiation of wheat root cells exposed to a high nickel concentration

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/dynamics-of-growth-proliferation-and-differentiation-of-wheat-root-9lADTmdo4k
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by MAIK Nauka
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences ; Plant Physiology
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1021443708060083
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The dynamics of root growth, proliferation of initial cells of the root cap, rhizodermis, and central metaxylem, as well as structural changes in the cells induced by a 72-h exposure to a high (0.1 mM) concentration of NiSO4 were studied in 3-day-old wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings. In the roots of control plants, we observed a 12-h rhythm of changes in the length of the cells that completed elongating. Upon the treatment with nickel, this effect was negated, and a considerable reduction in the root length increment was observed in 12 h. In 24 h, root growth essentially ceased. Cell elongation was suppressed acropetally, and the cells, whose elongation was over, became shorter. In the meristem and apical part of the elongation zone, slow cell growth continued during the second and even third days. Autoradiography showed that the earliest effect of nickel on the processes of root morphogenesis observed in 6 h was a suppression of cell transition to DNA synthesis. The cells, where DNA synthesis has already started or which were in other stages of the cycle, continued to pass slowly through the cycle and completed it. Sister cells formed as a result of division subsequently left the cycle in the phase G1 and transited to dormancy. It was found that the main mechanism of cell proliferation cessation was the suppression of cell transition to DNA synthesis. In the cells elongating when exposed to nickel, tissue-specific changes in the nucleus structure were observed (chromatolysis in the rhizodermis and cortex, pycnosis in the endodermis, a disturbance of the nucleus structure in the central metaxylem). These disorders were only observed after cessation of elongation. Root incubation in 0.1 mM nickel solution did not affect the onset of cell differentiation in the xylem and metaphloem and shifted its beginning to the root tip. However, in 24 h the initiation and growth of root hairs were suppressed. It was concluded that tissue-specific nickel-induced changes in the nucleus structure in the elongating cells do not cause the cessation of root growth, although point to nickel toxic effect on the cells in the course of elongation.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 31, 2008

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off