Duration of Pharmacotherapy with Long-Acting Injectable Risperidone in the Treatment of Schizophrenia

Duration of Pharmacotherapy with Long-Acting Injectable Risperidone in the Treatment of... Although long-acting injectable risperidone (LAIR) has been hypothesized to improve medication adherence compared to oral medications, data from real-world practice have yet to be presented on time to treatment discontinuation. Records of all new prescriptions for antipsychotic medication during the first 2 months of FY 2006 for VA patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (N = 11,821) were examined and duration of treatment with LAIR and oral antipsychotics were calculated for the next 2 years. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify patient characteristics independently associated with receipt of LAIR. Proportional hazards models were used to compare the likelihood of discontinuing each of the medications as compared to LAIR. Altogether, 2.4% of the 11,821 new starts were prescribed LAIR, 44.6% of whom continued therapy for 540–720 days (18–24 months), less than the 77.1% of those on clozapine, 57.9% on oral conventional antipsychotics, 55.0% on olanzapine, and 49.5% on risperidone, but more than the 27.7% on aripiprazole. After adjusting for potentially confounding factors, patients who were initiated on LAIR were more likely to discontinue their medication than those who were initiated on oral first- or second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) with the exception ziprasidone and aripiprazole. Less than half of patients on LAIR continued treatment for 18 months, a smaller proportion than of those started on most oral first- or second-generation antipsychotics, suggesting that for many patients with schizophrenia improved adherence from this treatment may not be sustained. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychiatric Quarterly Springer Journals

Duration of Pharmacotherapy with Long-Acting Injectable Risperidone in the Treatment of Schizophrenia

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/duration-of-pharmacotherapy-with-long-acting-injectable-risperidone-in-6klcJHVFZ4
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Psychiatry; Public Health; Sociology, general
ISSN
0033-2720
eISSN
1573-6709
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11126-009-9111-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although long-acting injectable risperidone (LAIR) has been hypothesized to improve medication adherence compared to oral medications, data from real-world practice have yet to be presented on time to treatment discontinuation. Records of all new prescriptions for antipsychotic medication during the first 2 months of FY 2006 for VA patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (N = 11,821) were examined and duration of treatment with LAIR and oral antipsychotics were calculated for the next 2 years. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify patient characteristics independently associated with receipt of LAIR. Proportional hazards models were used to compare the likelihood of discontinuing each of the medications as compared to LAIR. Altogether, 2.4% of the 11,821 new starts were prescribed LAIR, 44.6% of whom continued therapy for 540–720 days (18–24 months), less than the 77.1% of those on clozapine, 57.9% on oral conventional antipsychotics, 55.0% on olanzapine, and 49.5% on risperidone, but more than the 27.7% on aripiprazole. After adjusting for potentially confounding factors, patients who were initiated on LAIR were more likely to discontinue their medication than those who were initiated on oral first- or second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) with the exception ziprasidone and aripiprazole. Less than half of patients on LAIR continued treatment for 18 months, a smaller proportion than of those started on most oral first- or second-generation antipsychotics, suggesting that for many patients with schizophrenia improved adherence from this treatment may not be sustained.

Journal

Psychiatric QuarterlySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 19, 2009

References

  • Use of depot antipsychotic medications for medication nonadherence in schizophrenia
    West, JC; Marcus, SC; Wilk, J; Countis, LM; Regier, DA; Olfson, M
  • Extrapyramidal side effects with atypical neuroleptics in bipolar disorder
    Ghaemi, SN; Hsu, DJ; Rosenquist, KJ; Pardo, TB; Goodwin, FK

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off