Does static electric field from ultra-high voltage direct-current transmission lines affect male reproductive capacity? Evidence from a laboratory study on male mice

Does static electric field from ultra-high voltage direct-current transmission lines affect male... With the development of ultra-high-voltage direct-current (UHVDC) transmission technology and increase in transmission voltage, the issue of environmental static electric field (SEF) pollution is standing out and its possible health effects have caused much public attention. In this study, the effects of chronic exposure to SEF on reproductive capacity of male mice were investigated. Twenty Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice were exposed to SEF (56.3 ± 1.4 kV/m, 49 days) generated by a high-voltage device. Several biological end points related to spermatogenesis and testicular function were evaluated, including reproductive organ coefficients, sperm motility and morphology, serum testosterone level, and testicular histology. No significant differences were found between the SEF-exposed and sham-exposed groups at the end of the exposure period. However, further observation through transmission electron microscopy revealed cristae losses in mitochondria of spermatogenic cells after SEF exposure. Nevertheless, the mitochondria injury did not affect sperm motility, which might be explained from the perspective of energy supply. That is, most of the energy required for sperm movement is generated by glycolysis which occurs in the cytoplasm rather than oxidative phosphorylation which occurs in mitochondria. In conclusion, this study indicates that exposure to SEF (56.3 ± 1.4 kV/m, 49 days) has limited effects on male reproductive capacity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Science and Pollution Research Springer Journals

Does static electric field from ultra-high voltage direct-current transmission lines affect male reproductive capacity? Evidence from a laboratory study on male mice

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Environmental Chemistry; Ecotoxicology; Environmental Health; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution
ISSN
0944-1344
eISSN
1614-7499
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11356-017-9229-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

With the development of ultra-high-voltage direct-current (UHVDC) transmission technology and increase in transmission voltage, the issue of environmental static electric field (SEF) pollution is standing out and its possible health effects have caused much public attention. In this study, the effects of chronic exposure to SEF on reproductive capacity of male mice were investigated. Twenty Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice were exposed to SEF (56.3 ± 1.4 kV/m, 49 days) generated by a high-voltage device. Several biological end points related to spermatogenesis and testicular function were evaluated, including reproductive organ coefficients, sperm motility and morphology, serum testosterone level, and testicular histology. No significant differences were found between the SEF-exposed and sham-exposed groups at the end of the exposure period. However, further observation through transmission electron microscopy revealed cristae losses in mitochondria of spermatogenic cells after SEF exposure. Nevertheless, the mitochondria injury did not affect sperm motility, which might be explained from the perspective of energy supply. That is, most of the energy required for sperm movement is generated by glycolysis which occurs in the cytoplasm rather than oxidative phosphorylation which occurs in mitochondria. In conclusion, this study indicates that exposure to SEF (56.3 ± 1.4 kV/m, 49 days) has limited effects on male reproductive capacity.

Journal

Environmental Science and Pollution ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 17, 2017

References

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