Does Income Inequality Influence Subjective Wellbeing? Evidence from 21 Developing Countries

Does Income Inequality Influence Subjective Wellbeing? Evidence from 21 Developing Countries J Happiness Stud https://doi.org/10.1007/s10902-018-9992-0 RESEARCH PAPER Does Income Inequality Influence Subjective Wellbeing? Evidence from 21 Developing Countries 1,2 3 4 2 Victoria Reyes‑García  · Arild Angelsen  · Gerald E. Shively  · Dmitrij Minkin © Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018 Abstract Does income inequality matter for subjective wellbeing? Using data from 5945 individuals residing in 182 villages in rural areas of 21 developing countries, we test the relative importance of income inequality measured at different levels (country and vil - lage) in subjective wellbeing. Country-level inequality might increase subjective wellbe- ing because it signals potential upward mobility, whereas village-level inequality might exacerbate negative effects of local peer-group comparisons on subjective wellbeing. The two measures of income inequality are not correlated, supporting the intuition that these variables might capture different aspects of income inequality. Although we observe broad patterns that suggest inequality measured at different levels might have associations with subjective wellbeing, and with potentially differing signs, the low magnitude of these asso - ciations and their weak statistical significance do not provide enough evidence to support the argument that the level at which income inequality is measured explains overall pat- terns of subjective wellbeing. Our results therefore leave open for future research http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Happiness Studies Springer Journals

Does Income Inequality Influence Subjective Wellbeing? Evidence from 21 Developing Countries

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/does-income-inequality-influence-subjective-wellbeing-evidence-from-21-PNNEfGfNoD
Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature
Subject
Social Sciences; Quality of Life Research; Personality and Social Psychology; Economics, general; Quality of Life Research; Philosophy, general; Positive Psychology
ISSN
1389-4978
eISSN
1573-7780
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10902-018-9992-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

J Happiness Stud https://doi.org/10.1007/s10902-018-9992-0 RESEARCH PAPER Does Income Inequality Influence Subjective Wellbeing? Evidence from 21 Developing Countries 1,2 3 4 2 Victoria Reyes‑García  · Arild Angelsen  · Gerald E. Shively  · Dmitrij Minkin © Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018 Abstract Does income inequality matter for subjective wellbeing? Using data from 5945 individuals residing in 182 villages in rural areas of 21 developing countries, we test the relative importance of income inequality measured at different levels (country and vil - lage) in subjective wellbeing. Country-level inequality might increase subjective wellbe- ing because it signals potential upward mobility, whereas village-level inequality might exacerbate negative effects of local peer-group comparisons on subjective wellbeing. The two measures of income inequality are not correlated, supporting the intuition that these variables might capture different aspects of income inequality. Although we observe broad patterns that suggest inequality measured at different levels might have associations with subjective wellbeing, and with potentially differing signs, the low magnitude of these asso - ciations and their weak statistical significance do not provide enough evidence to support the argument that the level at which income inequality is measured explains overall pat- terns of subjective wellbeing. Our results therefore leave open for future research

Journal

Journal of Happiness StudiesSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 4, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off