Do people with intersecting identities report more high-risk alcohol use and lifetime substance use?

Do people with intersecting identities report more high-risk alcohol use and lifetime substance use? Objectives We examined protective and non-protective effects of disadvantaged social identities and their intersections on lifetime substance use and risky alcohol consumption. Methods Data from 90,941 participants of the Global Drug Survey 2015 were analysed. Multivariable logistic regressions were used to calculate adjusted odds ratios for lifetime use of nine psychoactive substances, as well as high-risk/harmful alcohol use. Disadvantaged identities from three categories (ethnicity, sexual identity, gender), and interactions between these were compared. Results Findings indicate that participants with disadvantaged ethnic and sexual minority identities are more likely to use psychoactive substances compared to their counterparts. The intersecting identity ‘disadvantaged ethnic identity and sexual minority’ appears to be protective compared to those with just one of these identities. While female gender appears to be highly protective in general, it is not protective among females with disadvantaged social identities. Conclusions Stark disparities in substance use between different social identities and their intersections emphasise the importance of intersectionality theories in public health research intervention design. Future research on health equity, particularly substance use, should target individuals with intersecting identities. Keywords Substance use  Alcohol use  Intersectionality  Health inequality  Minority health Drug Policy Modelling Program, National Drug and Alcohol http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Public Health Springer Journals

Do people with intersecting identities report more high-risk alcohol use and lifetime substance use?

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+)
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Public Health; Occupational Medicine/Industrial Medicine; Environmental Health
ISSN
1661-8556
eISSN
1661-8564
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00038-018-1095-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objectives We examined protective and non-protective effects of disadvantaged social identities and their intersections on lifetime substance use and risky alcohol consumption. Methods Data from 90,941 participants of the Global Drug Survey 2015 were analysed. Multivariable logistic regressions were used to calculate adjusted odds ratios for lifetime use of nine psychoactive substances, as well as high-risk/harmful alcohol use. Disadvantaged identities from three categories (ethnicity, sexual identity, gender), and interactions between these were compared. Results Findings indicate that participants with disadvantaged ethnic and sexual minority identities are more likely to use psychoactive substances compared to their counterparts. The intersecting identity ‘disadvantaged ethnic identity and sexual minority’ appears to be protective compared to those with just one of these identities. While female gender appears to be highly protective in general, it is not protective among females with disadvantaged social identities. Conclusions Stark disparities in substance use between different social identities and their intersections emphasise the importance of intersectionality theories in public health research intervention design. Future research on health equity, particularly substance use, should target individuals with intersecting identities. Keywords Substance use  Alcohol use  Intersectionality  Health inequality  Minority health Drug Policy Modelling Program, National Drug and Alcohol

Journal

International Journal of Public HealthSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 31, 2018

References

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