do i know its wrong: children’s and adults’ use of unconventional grammar in text messaging

do i know its wrong: children’s and adults’ use of unconventional grammar in text messaging There is concern that the violations of conventional grammar (both accidental and deliberate) often seen in text messages (e.g., hi[InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.]how is ya?!!) could lead to difficulty in learning or remembering formal grammatical conventions. We examined whether the grammatical violations made by 244 British children, adolescents and young adults in their text messages was related to poorer performance on tasks of grammatical knowledge, including translating grammatically unconventional text messages into standard English. We found that variance in the production of grammatical violations in naturalistic messages was inconsistently predicted by grammatical task performance. Specifically, primary school children who made poorer grammar-based spelling choices were more likely to make more grammatical violations in their everyday messages, and university students who failed to correct more grammatical errors in a given set of messages were also more likely to make such errors in their own messages. There were no significant relationships for secondary school students. We conclude that using unconventional grammar when texting is not a consistent sign of poor grammatical abilities, although there may be links between some aspects of grammatical skill and grammatical violations in text messages. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reading and Writing Springer Journals

do i know its wrong: children’s and adults’ use of unconventional grammar in text messaging

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Linguistics; Languages and Literature; Psycholinguistics; Education (general); Neurology; Interdisciplinary Studies
ISSN
0922-4777
eISSN
1573-0905
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11145-014-9508-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There is concern that the violations of conventional grammar (both accidental and deliberate) often seen in text messages (e.g., hi[InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.]how is ya?!!) could lead to difficulty in learning or remembering formal grammatical conventions. We examined whether the grammatical violations made by 244 British children, adolescents and young adults in their text messages was related to poorer performance on tasks of grammatical knowledge, including translating grammatically unconventional text messages into standard English. We found that variance in the production of grammatical violations in naturalistic messages was inconsistently predicted by grammatical task performance. Specifically, primary school children who made poorer grammar-based spelling choices were more likely to make more grammatical violations in their everyday messages, and university students who failed to correct more grammatical errors in a given set of messages were also more likely to make such errors in their own messages. There were no significant relationships for secondary school students. We conclude that using unconventional grammar when texting is not a consistent sign of poor grammatical abilities, although there may be links between some aspects of grammatical skill and grammatical violations in text messages.

Journal

Reading and WritingSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 1, 2014

References

  • Text-message abbreviations and language skills in high school and university students
    Jonge, S; Kemp, N
  • Is it misspelled or is it mispelled? The influence of fresh orthographic information on spelling
    Dixon, M; Kaminska, Z
  • College students’ text messaging, use of textese and literacy skills
    Drouin, M. A.

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