Diversity, Daily Flight Activity and Temporal Occurrence of Necrophagous Diptera Associated with Decomposing Carcasses in a Semi-Arid Environment

Diversity, Daily Flight Activity and Temporal Occurrence of Necrophagous Diptera Associated with... The harsh conditions of the Brazilian seasonally dry tropical forest known as Caatinga pose challenges to the insects specialized in the exploitation of ephemeral resources. We investigated the diversity and daily flight activity of dipterans associated with decomposing rat carcasses in a field experiment performed in the semi-arid region of Pernambuco State, Brazil. We also analyzed the temporal arrival of adult insects on the carcasses at three stages of decomposition: early, intermediate, and advanced. We collected 1173 individuals, of which Muscidae had the highest abundance (36.5%), followed by Sarcophagidae (28.1%), Calliphoridae (25.2%), and Fanniidae (10.2%). Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann, 1819) (Calliphoridae), Fannia pusio (Wiedemann, 1830) (Fanniidae), Atherigona orientalis (Schiner, 1868), and Musca domestica (Linnaeus, 1758) (Muscidae) were the most abundant species. The richness reached its maximum value on the second day of decomposition, with 18 species, decreasing to 8 species on the last day of decomposition (7 days). The ecological indices of diversity, dominance, and evenness varied little among the stages. There was an overlap of most species throughout the decomposition, although the overall abundance was higher at the intermediate stage for Calliphoridae, Muscidae, and Sarcophagidae. In accordance to previous studies, nocturnal flight was rare, as approximately 8% of insects were captured at night. Our results expand the knowledge on ecological and behavioral aspects of necrophagous flies under inhospitable environments, such as the dry season in the Caatinga. The dominance of the invasive species C. albiceps reinforced here illustrates its geographical expansion towards the countryside of Northeastern Brazil. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neotropical Entomology Springer Journals

Diversity, Daily Flight Activity and Temporal Occurrence of Necrophagous Diptera Associated with Decomposing Carcasses in a Semi-Arid Environment

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/diversity-daily-flight-activity-and-temporal-occurrence-of-ZLqDsU9QdP
Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Sociedade Entomológica do Brasil
Subject
Life Sciences; Entomology; Agriculture; Life Sciences, general
ISSN
1519-566X
eISSN
1678-8052
D.O.I.
10.1007/s13744-017-0540-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The harsh conditions of the Brazilian seasonally dry tropical forest known as Caatinga pose challenges to the insects specialized in the exploitation of ephemeral resources. We investigated the diversity and daily flight activity of dipterans associated with decomposing rat carcasses in a field experiment performed in the semi-arid region of Pernambuco State, Brazil. We also analyzed the temporal arrival of adult insects on the carcasses at three stages of decomposition: early, intermediate, and advanced. We collected 1173 individuals, of which Muscidae had the highest abundance (36.5%), followed by Sarcophagidae (28.1%), Calliphoridae (25.2%), and Fanniidae (10.2%). Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann, 1819) (Calliphoridae), Fannia pusio (Wiedemann, 1830) (Fanniidae), Atherigona orientalis (Schiner, 1868), and Musca domestica (Linnaeus, 1758) (Muscidae) were the most abundant species. The richness reached its maximum value on the second day of decomposition, with 18 species, decreasing to 8 species on the last day of decomposition (7 days). The ecological indices of diversity, dominance, and evenness varied little among the stages. There was an overlap of most species throughout the decomposition, although the overall abundance was higher at the intermediate stage for Calliphoridae, Muscidae, and Sarcophagidae. In accordance to previous studies, nocturnal flight was rare, as approximately 8% of insects were captured at night. Our results expand the knowledge on ecological and behavioral aspects of necrophagous flies under inhospitable environments, such as the dry season in the Caatinga. The dominance of the invasive species C. albiceps reinforced here illustrates its geographical expansion towards the countryside of Northeastern Brazil.

Journal

Neotropical EntomologySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 27, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off