Divergent patterns of breakpoint reuse in Muroid rodents

Divergent patterns of breakpoint reuse in Muroid rodents Multiple Genome Rearrangement (MGR) analysis was used to define the trajectory and pattern of chromosome rearrangement within muroid rodents. MGR was applied using 107 chromosome homologies between Mus, Rattus, Peromyscus, the muroid sister taxon Cricetulus griseus, and Sciurus carolinensis as a non-Muroidea outgroup, with specific attention paid to breakpoint reuse and centromere evolution. This analysis revealed a high level of chromosome breakpoint conservation between Rattus and Peromyscus and indicated that the chromosomes of Mus are highly derived. This analysis identified several conserved evolutionary breakpoints that have been reused multiple times during karyotypic evolution in rodents. Our data demonstrate a high level of reuse of breakpoints among muroid rodents, further supporting the “Fragile Breakage Model” of chromosome evolution. We provide the first analysis of rodent centromeres with respect to evolutionary breakpoints. By analyzing closely related rodent species we were able to clarify muroid rodent karyotypic evolution. We were also able to derive several high-resolution ancestral karyotypes and identify rearrangements specific to various stages of Muroidea evolution. These data were useful in further characterizing lineage-specific modes of chromosome evolution. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalian Genome Springer Journals

Divergent patterns of breakpoint reuse in Muroid rodents

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Life Sciences; Zoology ; Anatomy ; Cell Biology
ISSN
0938-8990
eISSN
1432-1777
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00335-009-9242-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Multiple Genome Rearrangement (MGR) analysis was used to define the trajectory and pattern of chromosome rearrangement within muroid rodents. MGR was applied using 107 chromosome homologies between Mus, Rattus, Peromyscus, the muroid sister taxon Cricetulus griseus, and Sciurus carolinensis as a non-Muroidea outgroup, with specific attention paid to breakpoint reuse and centromere evolution. This analysis revealed a high level of chromosome breakpoint conservation between Rattus and Peromyscus and indicated that the chromosomes of Mus are highly derived. This analysis identified several conserved evolutionary breakpoints that have been reused multiple times during karyotypic evolution in rodents. Our data demonstrate a high level of reuse of breakpoints among muroid rodents, further supporting the “Fragile Breakage Model” of chromosome evolution. We provide the first analysis of rodent centromeres with respect to evolutionary breakpoints. By analyzing closely related rodent species we were able to clarify muroid rodent karyotypic evolution. We were also able to derive several high-resolution ancestral karyotypes and identify rearrangements specific to various stages of Muroidea evolution. These data were useful in further characterizing lineage-specific modes of chromosome evolution.

Journal

Mammalian GenomeSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 22, 2009

References

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