Distribution of Cadmium, Lead, Nickel, and Strontium in Imbibing Maize Caryopses

Distribution of Cadmium, Lead, Nickel, and Strontium in Imbibing Maize Caryopses Seed germination is tolerant to heavy metals apparently because the seed coat is impermeable to metal ions. However, it is not clear whether the seed coat is a universal barrier for all metals. In addition, depending on their physical and chemical properties, a distribution of various metals may differ within an imbibing caryopsis, and therefore they produce dissimilar effects on seed germination. The toxic effects of Cd(NO3)2, Pb(NO3)2, Ni(NO3)2, and Sr(NO3)2 were estimated from the germination rates of maize (Zea mays L.) caryopses following two-day incubation with these salts. The distribution of heavy metals and Sr was studied by histochemical methods based on the formation of colored complexes with dithizone (Cd and Pb), dimethylglyoxyme (Ni), and sodium rhodizonate (Sr). Although the metals under study did not affect maize radicle protrusion, they inhibited seed germination in the following order: Cd > Ni ≈ Pb > Sr. Cd and Pb accumulated mainly in the seed coat cells, but Sr and Ni in the embryo cells and in the cells of endosperm (Sr) and scutellum (Ni). Although Cd was found only in the seed coat, it was the strongest inhibitor of seed germination. Apparently, due to high toxicity, Cd exerted its inhibitory effect at the concentrations too low for histochemical assay. In spite of easy translocation across the seed coat of imbibing caryopses, Sr did not considerably inhibit radicle protrusion and seed germination, apparently because of its low toxicity and predominant localization in the apoplast of embryo and endosperm cells. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Distribution of Cadmium, Lead, Nickel, and Strontium in Imbibing Maize Caryopses

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Publisher
Nauka/Interperiodica
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences; Plant Physiology
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11183-005-0084-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Seed germination is tolerant to heavy metals apparently because the seed coat is impermeable to metal ions. However, it is not clear whether the seed coat is a universal barrier for all metals. In addition, depending on their physical and chemical properties, a distribution of various metals may differ within an imbibing caryopsis, and therefore they produce dissimilar effects on seed germination. The toxic effects of Cd(NO3)2, Pb(NO3)2, Ni(NO3)2, and Sr(NO3)2 were estimated from the germination rates of maize (Zea mays L.) caryopses following two-day incubation with these salts. The distribution of heavy metals and Sr was studied by histochemical methods based on the formation of colored complexes with dithizone (Cd and Pb), dimethylglyoxyme (Ni), and sodium rhodizonate (Sr). Although the metals under study did not affect maize radicle protrusion, they inhibited seed germination in the following order: Cd > Ni ≈ Pb > Sr. Cd and Pb accumulated mainly in the seed coat cells, but Sr and Ni in the embryo cells and in the cells of endosperm (Sr) and scutellum (Ni). Although Cd was found only in the seed coat, it was the strongest inhibitor of seed germination. Apparently, due to high toxicity, Cd exerted its inhibitory effect at the concentrations too low for histochemical assay. In spite of easy translocation across the seed coat of imbibing caryopses, Sr did not considerably inhibit radicle protrusion and seed germination, apparently because of its low toxicity and predominant localization in the apoplast of embryo and endosperm cells.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 9, 2005

References

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