Distribution and population characteristics of the soil mites Diapterobates notatus and Svalbardia paludicola (Acari: Oribatida: Ceratozetidae) in High Arctic Svalbard (Norway)

Distribution and population characteristics of the soil mites Diapterobates notatus and... The Oribatida of High Arctic Svalbard are faunistically relatively well known, but the distribution, density, stage structure and other population parameters of most species are unknown. Here we focus on two ceratozetid species, Diapterobates notatus (Thorell, 1871) and Svalbardia paludicola Thor, 1930, and investigate the summer density, stage and sex structure, proportion of gravid females and the body size of these species in 33 locations and 11 vegetation classes of Svalbard. Diapterobates notatus occurred in all vegetation classes and at 29 locations, whereas S. paludicola occurred in only two vegetation classes and at three locations. The common occurrence of D. notatus in Svalbard may be due to: (1) cosmopolitan nature of this species which inhabits all vegetation classes but with a preference for open Dryas/Carex rupestris communities, (2) high biological potential (females were more abundant than males and carried 6–7 large eggs) resulting in a high proportion of juveniles, and (3) juvenile morphology which possesses long setae that may enhance passive dispersal by the wind. Adult body size was found to be greatest in the floristically diverse Arctic meadows. Svalbardia paludicola was particularly abundant in the Arctic meadow at Reinsdyrflya where juveniles were more plentiful than the adults. The nymphs of this species have shorter gastronotal setae than those of D. notatus which may limit their passive transport by the wind. Scutozetes clavatosensillus Ermilov, Martens & Tolstikov, 2013 was found in Mosselbukta (north Spitsbergen); this is the first observation of this species in Svalbard. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Polar Biology Springer Journals

Distribution and population characteristics of the soil mites Diapterobates notatus and Svalbardia paludicola (Acari: Oribatida: Ceratozetidae) in High Arctic Svalbard (Norway)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/distribution-and-population-characteristics-of-the-soil-mites-tyxJQHk0t9
Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s)
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Oceanography; Microbiology; Plant Sciences; Zoology
ISSN
0722-4060
eISSN
1432-2056
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00300-017-2076-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Oribatida of High Arctic Svalbard are faunistically relatively well known, but the distribution, density, stage structure and other population parameters of most species are unknown. Here we focus on two ceratozetid species, Diapterobates notatus (Thorell, 1871) and Svalbardia paludicola Thor, 1930, and investigate the summer density, stage and sex structure, proportion of gravid females and the body size of these species in 33 locations and 11 vegetation classes of Svalbard. Diapterobates notatus occurred in all vegetation classes and at 29 locations, whereas S. paludicola occurred in only two vegetation classes and at three locations. The common occurrence of D. notatus in Svalbard may be due to: (1) cosmopolitan nature of this species which inhabits all vegetation classes but with a preference for open Dryas/Carex rupestris communities, (2) high biological potential (females were more abundant than males and carried 6–7 large eggs) resulting in a high proportion of juveniles, and (3) juvenile morphology which possesses long setae that may enhance passive dispersal by the wind. Adult body size was found to be greatest in the floristically diverse Arctic meadows. Svalbardia paludicola was particularly abundant in the Arctic meadow at Reinsdyrflya where juveniles were more plentiful than the adults. The nymphs of this species have shorter gastronotal setae than those of D. notatus which may limit their passive transport by the wind. Scutozetes clavatosensillus Ermilov, Martens & Tolstikov, 2013 was found in Mosselbukta (north Spitsbergen); this is the first observation of this species in Svalbard.

Journal

Polar BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 9, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off