Discovery learning: zombie, phoenix, or elephant?

Discovery learning: zombie, phoenix, or elephant? Discovery learning continues to be a topic of heated debate. It has been called a zombie, and this special issue raises the question whether it may be a phoenix arising from the ashes to which the topic was burnt. However, in this commentary I propose it is more like an elephant—a huge topic approached by many people who address different aspects. What is needed in the discussion about discovery learning and related approaches, I argue, is sublation: the kind of lifting up from the one-dimensional discussion between two extremes (minimal guidance vs. direct instruction) that puts an end to the everlasting tug of war by integrating justified concerns from both opposite positions. I evaluate how the different contributions to the special issue help to sublate the discussion about discovery learning. In particular, the case study presented by Trninic illustrates how strong guidance and repetition may be needed for the discovery of something that cannot be told. I further suggest scaffolding, inferentialism, and design research as potential theoretical and methodological ways forward. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Instructional Science Springer Journals

Discovery learning: zombie, phoenix, or elephant?

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by The Author(s)
Subject
Education; Learning and Instruction; Educational Psychology; Pedagogic Psychology
ISSN
0020-4277
eISSN
1573-1952
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11251-018-9450-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Discovery learning continues to be a topic of heated debate. It has been called a zombie, and this special issue raises the question whether it may be a phoenix arising from the ashes to which the topic was burnt. However, in this commentary I propose it is more like an elephant—a huge topic approached by many people who address different aspects. What is needed in the discussion about discovery learning and related approaches, I argue, is sublation: the kind of lifting up from the one-dimensional discussion between two extremes (minimal guidance vs. direct instruction) that puts an end to the everlasting tug of war by integrating justified concerns from both opposite positions. I evaluate how the different contributions to the special issue help to sublate the discussion about discovery learning. In particular, the case study presented by Trninic illustrates how strong guidance and repetition may be needed for the discovery of something that cannot be told. I further suggest scaffolding, inferentialism, and design research as potential theoretical and methodological ways forward.

Journal

Instructional ScienceSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 5, 2018

References

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