Differential invasion success of salmonids in southern Chile: patterns and hypotheses

Differential invasion success of salmonids in southern Chile: patterns and hypotheses Biological invasions create complex ecological and societal issues worldwide. Most of the knowledge about invasions comes only from successful invaders, but less is known about which processes determine the differential success of invasions. In this review, we develop a framework to identify the main dimensions driving the success and failure of invaders, including human influences, characteristics of the invader, and biotic interactions. We apply this framework by contrasting hypotheses and available evidence to explain variability in invasion success for 12 salmonids introduced to Chile. The success of Oncorhynchus mykiss and Salmo trutta seems to be influenced by a context-specific combination of their phenotypic plasticity, low ecosystem resistance, and propagule pressure. These well-established invaders may limit the success of subsequently introduced salmonids, with the possible exception of O. tshawytscha, which has a short freshwater residency and limited spatial overlap with trout. Although propagule pressure is high for O. kisutch and S. salar due to their intensive use in aquaculture, their lack of success in Chile may be explained by environmental resistance, including earlier spawning times than in their native ranges, and interactions with previously established and resident Rainbow Trout. Other salmonids have also failed to establish, and they exhibit a suite of ecological traits, environmental resistance, and limited propagule pressure that are variably associated with their lack of success. Collectively, understanding how the various drivers of invasion success interact may explain the differential success of invaders and provide key guidance for managing both positive and negative outcomes associated with their presence. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals
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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Springer International Publishing Switzerland
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Zoology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11160-014-9351-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Biological invasions create complex ecological and societal issues worldwide. Most of the knowledge about invasions comes only from successful invaders, but less is known about which processes determine the differential success of invasions. In this review, we develop a framework to identify the main dimensions driving the success and failure of invaders, including human influences, characteristics of the invader, and biotic interactions. We apply this framework by contrasting hypotheses and available evidence to explain variability in invasion success for 12 salmonids introduced to Chile. The success of Oncorhynchus mykiss and Salmo trutta seems to be influenced by a context-specific combination of their phenotypic plasticity, low ecosystem resistance, and propagule pressure. These well-established invaders may limit the success of subsequently introduced salmonids, with the possible exception of O. tshawytscha, which has a short freshwater residency and limited spatial overlap with trout. Although propagule pressure is high for O. kisutch and S. salar due to their intensive use in aquaculture, their lack of success in Chile may be explained by environmental resistance, including earlier spawning times than in their native ranges, and interactions with previously established and resident Rainbow Trout. Other salmonids have also failed to establish, and they exhibit a suite of ecological traits, environmental resistance, and limited propagule pressure that are variably associated with their lack of success. Collectively, understanding how the various drivers of invasion success interact may explain the differential success of invaders and provide key guidance for managing both positive and negative outcomes associated with their presence.

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 24, 2014

References

  • Aquaculture, non-native salmonid invasions and associated declines of native fishes in northern Patagonian lakes
    Arismendi, I; Soto, D; Penaluna, B; Jara, C; Leal, C; León-Muñoz, J
  • Tolerance of parr of Arctic Charr, Salvelinus alpinus, to reduced dissolved oxygen concentrations
    Baroudy, E; Elliott, JM
  • Colonization of the southern Patagonia ocean by exotic Chinook Salmon
    Becker, LA; Pascual, MA; Basso, NG
  • Evolutionary rescue can prevent extinction following environmental change
    Bell, G; Gonzalez, A
  • Exotic herbivores directly facilitate the exotic grasses they graze: mechanisms for an unexpected positive feedback between invaders
    Best, RJ; Arcese, P
  • Distribution of salmon-habitat potential relative to landscape characteristics and implications for conservation
    Burnett, KM; Reeves, GH; Miller, DJ; Clarke, S; Vance-Borland, K; Christiansen, K
  • A review of the impacts of salmonid farming on marine coastal ecosystems in the southeast Pacific
    Buschmann, AH; Riquelme, VA; Hernández-González, MC; Varela, D; Jiménez, JE; Henríquez, LA; Vergara, PA; Guíñez, R; Filún, L

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