Differential expression of genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in response to bacterial pathogens and inducers of defense responses

Differential expression of genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in response to bacterial... Calmodulin (CaM) plays an important role in sensing and transducing changes in cellular Ca2+ concentration in response to several biotic and abiotic stresses. Although CaM is implicated in plant-pathogen interactions, its molecular targets and their role in defense signaling pathway(s) are poorly understood. To elucidate the signaling pathways that link CaM to defense responses, we screened a cDNA library constructed from bean leaves undergoing a hypersensitive response (HR) with radiolabeled CaM isoforms. A total of 26 putative CBPs were identified. Sequencing of the cDNAs revealed that they represent 8 different genes. They are homologues of previously identified CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) in other systems. However, some CBPs are novel members of known CBP families. The proteins encoded by these clones bound CaM in a Ca2+-dependent manner. To determine if these CBPs are involved in plant defense responses, we analyzed their expression in bean leaves inoculated with compatible, incompatible and nonpathogenic bacterial strains. Expression of three CBPs including an isoform of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (PvCNGC-A) and two hypothetical proteins (PvCBP60-C and PvCBP60-D) was induced whereas the expression of two other isoforms of CNGCs (PvCNGC-Band PvCNGC-C) was repressed in response to incompatible pathogens. The expression of the rest, a small auxin up RNA (PvSAUR1) and two hypothetical proteins (PvCBP60-Aand PvCBP60-B), was not changed. The expression of most of the pathogen-regulated genes was also affected by salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, hydrogen peroxide and a fungal elicitor, which are known to induce defense responses. Our results strongly suggest that at least five bean CBPs are involved in plant defense responses. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Differential expression of genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in response to bacterial pathogens and inducers of defense responses

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Sciences; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1023001403794
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Calmodulin (CaM) plays an important role in sensing and transducing changes in cellular Ca2+ concentration in response to several biotic and abiotic stresses. Although CaM is implicated in plant-pathogen interactions, its molecular targets and their role in defense signaling pathway(s) are poorly understood. To elucidate the signaling pathways that link CaM to defense responses, we screened a cDNA library constructed from bean leaves undergoing a hypersensitive response (HR) with radiolabeled CaM isoforms. A total of 26 putative CBPs were identified. Sequencing of the cDNAs revealed that they represent 8 different genes. They are homologues of previously identified CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) in other systems. However, some CBPs are novel members of known CBP families. The proteins encoded by these clones bound CaM in a Ca2+-dependent manner. To determine if these CBPs are involved in plant defense responses, we analyzed their expression in bean leaves inoculated with compatible, incompatible and nonpathogenic bacterial strains. Expression of three CBPs including an isoform of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (PvCNGC-A) and two hypothetical proteins (PvCBP60-C and PvCBP60-D) was induced whereas the expression of two other isoforms of CNGCs (PvCNGC-Band PvCNGC-C) was repressed in response to incompatible pathogens. The expression of the rest, a small auxin up RNA (PvSAUR1) and two hypothetical proteins (PvCBP60-Aand PvCBP60-B), was not changed. The expression of most of the pathogen-regulated genes was also affected by salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, hydrogen peroxide and a fungal elicitor, which are known to induce defense responses. Our results strongly suggest that at least five bean CBPs are involved in plant defense responses.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 7, 2004

References

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