Different carbon sources affects biofloc volume, water quality and the survival and physiology of African catfish Clarias gariepinus fingerlings reared in an intensive biofloc technology system

Different carbon sources affects biofloc volume, water quality and the survival and physiology of... A 6-week experiment was performed to compare different carbon sources, i.e. sucrose, glycerol and rice bran, to a nitrogen ratio of 15:1 in a biofloc-based African catfish Clarias gariepinus culture system. Catfish survival, growth, whole-body proximate composition, body indices, liver histopathology and glycogen content were measured. Each treatment was triplicated in glass aquaria with each replicate containing 50 fish (500 fish/m3) with an initial weight ± SD of 5.06 ± 0.05 g. Glycerol significantly increased total biofloc production, and both the sucrose and glycerol treatments generally had lower nitrogenous levels, compared to the control. These levels spiked at week 2 in the rice bran treatment, leading to significantly lower survival compared to all other treatments. At both weeks 3 and 6, liver histopathology of fish in the rice bran treatment revealed substantial vacuolation and less glycogen while the highest was in fish from the glycerol treatment. Fish growth was unaffected among the treatments, but survival was highest in the glycerol treatment. Rice bran appears unsuitable for C. gariepinus, likely due to being a slower-releasing carbon source. Instead, glycerol is recommended based on significantly higher biofloc production and subsequently improved water quality and survival of C. gariepinus during their nursery culture. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Fisheries Science Springer Journals

Different carbon sources affects biofloc volume, water quality and the survival and physiology of African catfish Clarias gariepinus fingerlings reared in an intensive biofloc technology system

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/different-carbon-sources-affects-biofloc-volume-water-quality-and-the-wxKf8vc8R7
Publisher
Springer Japan
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Japanese Society of Fisheries Science
Subject
Life Sciences; Fish & Wildlife Biology & Management; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Food Science
ISSN
0919-9268
eISSN
1444-2906
D.O.I.
10.1007/s12562-017-1144-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A 6-week experiment was performed to compare different carbon sources, i.e. sucrose, glycerol and rice bran, to a nitrogen ratio of 15:1 in a biofloc-based African catfish Clarias gariepinus culture system. Catfish survival, growth, whole-body proximate composition, body indices, liver histopathology and glycogen content were measured. Each treatment was triplicated in glass aquaria with each replicate containing 50 fish (500 fish/m3) with an initial weight ± SD of 5.06 ± 0.05 g. Glycerol significantly increased total biofloc production, and both the sucrose and glycerol treatments generally had lower nitrogenous levels, compared to the control. These levels spiked at week 2 in the rice bran treatment, leading to significantly lower survival compared to all other treatments. At both weeks 3 and 6, liver histopathology of fish in the rice bran treatment revealed substantial vacuolation and less glycogen while the highest was in fish from the glycerol treatment. Fish growth was unaffected among the treatments, but survival was highest in the glycerol treatment. Rice bran appears unsuitable for C. gariepinus, likely due to being a slower-releasing carbon source. Instead, glycerol is recommended based on significantly higher biofloc production and subsequently improved water quality and survival of C. gariepinus during their nursery culture.

Journal

Fisheries ScienceSpringer Journals

Published: Nov 1, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off