Differences in EM-38 Readings Taken Above Crop Residues Versus Readings Taken with Instrument-Ground Contact

Differences in EM-38 Readings Taken Above Crop Residues Versus Readings Taken with... Soil apparent electrical conductivity (EC) as measured by electromagnetic induction (EM) using the Geonics® EM-38 has shown promise as a soil survey tool in Iowa and other parts of the American Midwest. Surveys made with the EM-38 often take place in the fall after harvest or in the spring prior to planting. Because of this, and because use of conservation tillage and other techniques that leave crop residues on the soil surface is prevalent in many parts of the United States, it is common for fields to have crop residues covering the soil surface when EM surveys are conducted. These residues might alter the soil EC values obtained with the EM-38. To test this possibility, soil EC was determined at two sites with three different types of residue cover (corn (Zea mays L.), soybeans (Glycine max L.), and durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L.)). The residue cover at each site was then brushed aside, and the soil EC was determined with bare ground exposed to the EM-38. On average, soil EC readings were 0.2 mS/m higher when the EM-38 was exposed to bare ground, and 68% of the bare ground readings were higher than the corresponding readings through crop residues. However, the 0.2 mS/m average difference is not significant when compared to the natural variation found in soil EC readings within any given soil series. Therefore, the results of this study indicate that soil EC values obtained with the EM-38 through crop residues are valid representations of the actual soil EC value. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Precision Agriculture Springer Journals

Differences in EM-38 Readings Taken Above Crop Residues Versus Readings Taken with Instrument-Ground Contact

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/differences-in-em-38-readings-taken-above-crop-residues-versus-excT23atEx
Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Agriculture; Soil Science & Conservation; Remote Sensing/Photogrammetry; Statistics for Engineering, Physics, Computer Science, Chemistry and Earth Sciences; Atmospheric Sciences
ISSN
1385-2256
eISSN
1573-1618
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1026319307801
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Soil apparent electrical conductivity (EC) as measured by electromagnetic induction (EM) using the Geonics® EM-38 has shown promise as a soil survey tool in Iowa and other parts of the American Midwest. Surveys made with the EM-38 often take place in the fall after harvest or in the spring prior to planting. Because of this, and because use of conservation tillage and other techniques that leave crop residues on the soil surface is prevalent in many parts of the United States, it is common for fields to have crop residues covering the soil surface when EM surveys are conducted. These residues might alter the soil EC values obtained with the EM-38. To test this possibility, soil EC was determined at two sites with three different types of residue cover (corn (Zea mays L.), soybeans (Glycine max L.), and durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L.)). The residue cover at each site was then brushed aside, and the soil EC was determined with bare ground exposed to the EM-38. On average, soil EC readings were 0.2 mS/m higher when the EM-38 was exposed to bare ground, and 68% of the bare ground readings were higher than the corresponding readings through crop residues. However, the 0.2 mS/m average difference is not significant when compared to the natural variation found in soil EC readings within any given soil series. Therefore, the results of this study indicate that soil EC values obtained with the EM-38 through crop residues are valid representations of the actual soil EC value.

Journal

Precision AgricultureSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 3, 2004

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off