Dietary Fiber Concentrates from Fruit and Vegetable By-products: Processing, Modification, and Application as Functional Ingredients

Dietary Fiber Concentrates from Fruit and Vegetable By-products: Processing, Modification, and... The food industry is continuously looking for new sources of dietary fiber (DF) to use as an ingredient due to its well-known health benefits associated to its consumption. Usually, DF used for this purpose is obtained from cereal products or their by-products; however, by-products produced from the fruit and vegetable industry have comparatively higher DF content with more diverse compositions. DF concentrates (DFC), obtained by the processing of fruit and vegetable by-products, are suitable for food formulations because of their unique technological functionalities and applicabilities, both closely related to the DF composition. This review describes the DF definition and analytical procedures for its quantification, the processing of fruit and vegetable by-products aimed to obtain high quality DFC, as well as the control of the processing conditions to obtain DFC with specific functionalities. Furthermore, it deals with the role of the modifications by thermal and non-thermal technologies, as well as of the application of DFC in several food formulations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food and Bioprocess Technology Springer Journals

Dietary Fiber Concentrates from Fruit and Vegetable By-products: Processing, Modification, and Application as Functional Ingredients

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/dietary-fiber-concentrates-from-fruit-and-vegetable-by-products-RO01ymrXoy
Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Chemistry; Food Science; Chemistry/Food Science, general; Agriculture; Biotechnology
ISSN
1935-5130
eISSN
1935-5149
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11947-018-2117-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The food industry is continuously looking for new sources of dietary fiber (DF) to use as an ingredient due to its well-known health benefits associated to its consumption. Usually, DF used for this purpose is obtained from cereal products or their by-products; however, by-products produced from the fruit and vegetable industry have comparatively higher DF content with more diverse compositions. DF concentrates (DFC), obtained by the processing of fruit and vegetable by-products, are suitable for food formulations because of their unique technological functionalities and applicabilities, both closely related to the DF composition. This review describes the DF definition and analytical procedures for its quantification, the processing of fruit and vegetable by-products aimed to obtain high quality DFC, as well as the control of the processing conditions to obtain DFC with specific functionalities. Furthermore, it deals with the role of the modifications by thermal and non-thermal technologies, as well as of the application of DFC in several food formulations.

Journal

Food and Bioprocess TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: May 31, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off