Development of arbuscular mycorrhiza in highly responsive and mycotrophic host plant–black medick (Medicago lupulina L.)

Development of arbuscular mycorrhiza in highly responsive and mycotrophic host plant–black... The main phases of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) development were analyzed in black medick (Medicago lupulina) with Glomus intraradices. Methods of light and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate AM. The first mycorrhization was identified on the seventh day after sowing. M. lupulina with AM-fungus Glomus intraradices formed Arum type of AM. Roots of black medick at fruiting stage (on the 88th day) were characterized by the development of forceful mycelium. The thickness of mycelium was comparable with the vascular system of root central cylinder. The development of vesicules into intraradical spores was shown. Micelium, arbuscules, and vesicules developed in close vicinity to the division zone of root tip. This might be evidence of an active symbiotic interaction between partners. All stages of fungal development and breeding, including intraradical spores (in intercellular matrix of root cortex), were identified in the roots of black medick, which indicated an active utilization of host plant nutrient substrates by the mycosymbiont. Plant cell cytoplasm extension was identified around young arbuscular branches but not for intracellular hyphae. The presence of active symbiosis was confirmed by increased accumulation of phosphorus in M. lupulina root tissues under conditions of G. intraradices inoculation and low phosphorus level in the soil. Thus, black medick cultivar-population can be characterized as an ecologically obligate mycotrophic plant under conditions of low level of available phosphorus in the soil. Specific features of AM development in intensively mycotrophic black medick, starting from the stage of the first true leaf until host plant fruiting, were evaluated. The obtained plant-microbe system is a perspective model object for further ultracytological and molecular genetic studies of the mechanisms controlling arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiotic efficiency, including selection and investigation of new symbiotic plant mutants. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Developmental Biology Springer Journals

Development of arbuscular mycorrhiza in highly responsive and mycotrophic host plant–black medick (Medicago lupulina L.)

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Publisher
Pleiades Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by Pleiades Publishing, Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Developmental Biology; Animal Anatomy / Morphology / Histology
ISSN
1062-3604
eISSN
1608-3326
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1062360415050082
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The main phases of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) development were analyzed in black medick (Medicago lupulina) with Glomus intraradices. Methods of light and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate AM. The first mycorrhization was identified on the seventh day after sowing. M. lupulina with AM-fungus Glomus intraradices formed Arum type of AM. Roots of black medick at fruiting stage (on the 88th day) were characterized by the development of forceful mycelium. The thickness of mycelium was comparable with the vascular system of root central cylinder. The development of vesicules into intraradical spores was shown. Micelium, arbuscules, and vesicules developed in close vicinity to the division zone of root tip. This might be evidence of an active symbiotic interaction between partners. All stages of fungal development and breeding, including intraradical spores (in intercellular matrix of root cortex), were identified in the roots of black medick, which indicated an active utilization of host plant nutrient substrates by the mycosymbiont. Plant cell cytoplasm extension was identified around young arbuscular branches but not for intracellular hyphae. The presence of active symbiosis was confirmed by increased accumulation of phosphorus in M. lupulina root tissues under conditions of G. intraradices inoculation and low phosphorus level in the soil. Thus, black medick cultivar-population can be characterized as an ecologically obligate mycotrophic plant under conditions of low level of available phosphorus in the soil. Specific features of AM development in intensively mycotrophic black medick, starting from the stage of the first true leaf until host plant fruiting, were evaluated. The obtained plant-microbe system is a perspective model object for further ultracytological and molecular genetic studies of the mechanisms controlling arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiotic efficiency, including selection and investigation of new symbiotic plant mutants.

Journal

Russian Journal of Developmental BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 11, 2015

References

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