Detecting Untruthful Answering in Randomized Response Sampling

Detecting Untruthful Answering in Randomized Response Sampling This paper considers the problem of unbiasedly estimating the population proportion when the study variable is potential sensitive in nature. In order to protect the respondent’s privacy, various techniques of generating randomized response rather than direct response are available in the literature. But the theory concerning them is developed only under the hypothesis of completely truthful reporting. Actually, the occurrence of untruthful reporting is a prospect in dealing with highly sensitive matters such as abortion or socially deviant behaviors. Illustrating Warner’s [(1965), Journal of the American Statistical Association. 60: 63–69] randomized response technique we show how unbiased estimation of the population proportion can be extended to cover a case when some respondents may lie. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality & Quantity Springer Journals

Detecting Untruthful Answering in Randomized Response Sampling

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/detecting-untruthful-answering-in-randomized-response-sampling-6e0vG0zECW
Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer
Subject
Social Sciences; Methodology of the Social Sciences; Social Sciences, general
ISSN
0033-5177
eISSN
1573-7845
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11135-005-1613-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper considers the problem of unbiasedly estimating the population proportion when the study variable is potential sensitive in nature. In order to protect the respondent’s privacy, various techniques of generating randomized response rather than direct response are available in the literature. But the theory concerning them is developed only under the hypothesis of completely truthful reporting. Actually, the occurrence of untruthful reporting is a prospect in dealing with highly sensitive matters such as abortion or socially deviant behaviors. Illustrating Warner’s [(1965), Journal of the American Statistical Association. 60: 63–69] randomized response technique we show how unbiased estimation of the population proportion can be extended to cover a case when some respondents may lie.

Journal

Quality & QuantitySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 2, 2005

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off