Describing pediatric acute kidney injury in children admitted from the emergency department

Describing pediatric acute kidney injury in children admitted from the emergency department Objective To define those children who develop acute kidney injury (AKI) within 48 h of admission from the emergency department (ED) and ascertain patient-related factors in the ED associated with AKI. Methods Retrospective, cohort study of children, birth to 19 years, admitted to a tertiary pediatric hospital from the ED between January 2010 and December 2013 who had serum creatinine (SCr) drawn as part of clinical care. AKI was defined as a 50% increase in SCr above baseline, as measured within 48 h of hospital presentation. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to determine factors associated with AKI by comparing those with and without kidney injury on hospital presentation. Results Of all ED admissions, 13,827 subjects (27%) were included; 10% developed AKI. Of kids with AKI, 75% had a measured SCr consistent with AKI while in the ED, 36% were admitted to the intensive care unit, and 2% died (all significantly more than children without AKI). Young age, history of AKI or solid organ transplant, receipt of intravenous fluids or central venous access in the ED, and admission to intensive care were factors independently associated with AKI (AUC = 0.793, 95% CI 0.78–0.81). Conclusions One in 10 children who had http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pediatric Nephrology Springer Journals

Describing pediatric acute kidney injury in children admitted from the emergency department

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/describing-pediatric-acute-kidney-injury-in-children-admitted-from-the-1zhXdh9RdH
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by IPNA
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Pediatrics; Nephrology; Urology
ISSN
0931-041X
eISSN
1432-198X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00467-018-3909-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objective To define those children who develop acute kidney injury (AKI) within 48 h of admission from the emergency department (ED) and ascertain patient-related factors in the ED associated with AKI. Methods Retrospective, cohort study of children, birth to 19 years, admitted to a tertiary pediatric hospital from the ED between January 2010 and December 2013 who had serum creatinine (SCr) drawn as part of clinical care. AKI was defined as a 50% increase in SCr above baseline, as measured within 48 h of hospital presentation. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to determine factors associated with AKI by comparing those with and without kidney injury on hospital presentation. Results Of all ED admissions, 13,827 subjects (27%) were included; 10% developed AKI. Of kids with AKI, 75% had a measured SCr consistent with AKI while in the ED, 36% were admitted to the intensive care unit, and 2% died (all significantly more than children without AKI). Young age, history of AKI or solid organ transplant, receipt of intravenous fluids or central venous access in the ED, and admission to intensive care were factors independently associated with AKI (AUC = 0.793, 95% CI 0.78–0.81). Conclusions One in 10 children who had

Journal

Pediatric NephrologySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 17, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off