Depression and Anxiety: Lack of Associations with an Inadequate Diet in a Sample of Pregnant Women with a History of Bariatric Surgery—a Multicenter Prospective Controlled Cohort Study

Depression and Anxiety: Lack of Associations with an Inadequate Diet in a Sample of Pregnant... Background Anxiety and depression levels are higher in obese compared to those in normal weight pregnant women. The aims of this study are to examine anxiety and depression in pregnancy following bariatric surgery and to compare with obese pregnant controls considering the dietary intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), folate, and vitamin B . Methods Anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) and depression (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale) were examined in the first (T1) and third (T3) pregnancy trimester in 54 women with bariatric surgery and 25 obese. T1 and T3 dietary intake of PUFA, folate, and vitamin B intake was assessed using a 3-day food record. Mixed models with a compound symmetry covariance structure and regression models were applied. Results About half of the women with surgery had high state and trait anxiety scores (≥ 40), which did not significantly change during pregnancy. Every 10-kg postoperative weight loss was associated with an increase in T1 state and trait anxiety with respectively 2.7 and 2.3 points. A smoking woman had a 8.6-point higher state anxiety score than a non-smoking woman in T1. In T3, every additional hour of sleep was associated with a decrease in trait anxiety score with 1.59 points. Anxiety http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Obesity Surgery Springer Journals

Depression and Anxiety: Lack of Associations with an Inadequate Diet in a Sample of Pregnant Women with a History of Bariatric Surgery—a Multicenter Prospective Controlled Cohort Study

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Surgery
ISSN
0960-8923
eISSN
1708-0428
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11695-017-3060-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background Anxiety and depression levels are higher in obese compared to those in normal weight pregnant women. The aims of this study are to examine anxiety and depression in pregnancy following bariatric surgery and to compare with obese pregnant controls considering the dietary intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), folate, and vitamin B . Methods Anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) and depression (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale) were examined in the first (T1) and third (T3) pregnancy trimester in 54 women with bariatric surgery and 25 obese. T1 and T3 dietary intake of PUFA, folate, and vitamin B intake was assessed using a 3-day food record. Mixed models with a compound symmetry covariance structure and regression models were applied. Results About half of the women with surgery had high state and trait anxiety scores (≥ 40), which did not significantly change during pregnancy. Every 10-kg postoperative weight loss was associated with an increase in T1 state and trait anxiety with respectively 2.7 and 2.3 points. A smoking woman had a 8.6-point higher state anxiety score than a non-smoking woman in T1. In T3, every additional hour of sleep was associated with a decrease in trait anxiety score with 1.59 points. Anxiety

Journal

Obesity SurgerySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 12, 2017

References

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