Demographic implications of reproductive technologies

Demographic implications of reproductive technologies Medical advances in the infertility field are coming at a rapid pace. This paper examines four areas of demography that are being affected by the delivery of infertility services in the United States, or have the potential to be affected. The greatest effects are currently seen in the rapid increase in the rate of multiple deliveries, with smaller effects evident in delayed childbearing. To date the sex ratio at birth in the United States has not been affected by reproductive technologies. The experience from Asian countries such as Korea and China indicates that massive societal change coupled with reproductive technologies could bring about changes in the sex ratio at birth in the United States. The last area examined is the intergenerational transmission of infertility which to date has not been largely affected by reproductive technologies, but has the potential to affect a larger proportion of the population. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population Research and Policy Review Springer Journals

Demographic implications of reproductive technologies

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Geography; Demography; Economic Policy; Population Economics
ISSN
0167-5923
eISSN
1573-7829
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1026568113158
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Medical advances in the infertility field are coming at a rapid pace. This paper examines four areas of demography that are being affected by the delivery of infertility services in the United States, or have the potential to be affected. The greatest effects are currently seen in the rapid increase in the rate of multiple deliveries, with smaller effects evident in delayed childbearing. To date the sex ratio at birth in the United States has not been affected by reproductive technologies. The experience from Asian countries such as Korea and China indicates that massive societal change coupled with reproductive technologies could bring about changes in the sex ratio at birth in the United States. The last area examined is the intergenerational transmission of infertility which to date has not been largely affected by reproductive technologies, but has the potential to affect a larger proportion of the population.

Journal

Population Research and Policy ReviewSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 16, 2004

References

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