Decreased soil substrate availability with incubation time weakens the response of microbial respiration to high temperature in an alpine meadow on the Tibetan Plateau

Decreased soil substrate availability with incubation time weakens the response of microbial... Purpose Increased microbial respiration (Rm) usually decreases with warming time in incubation and field manipulative exper- iments, and substrate depletion and/or microbial thermal acclimation to warming is hypothesized to be responsible for this decrease. However, few studies have been conducted to determine the mechanism for this decrease, especially in alpine regions. Materials and methods First, soils taken from an alpine meadow on the Tibetan Plateau were incubated at three different temperatures (i.e., 5, 15, and 25 °C) with two soil moistures (i.e., 30 and 60% water holding capacity (WHC)) for 58 days, then another two experiments were conducted with incubation at high-low-high temperature (i.e., 25–15–25 °C) for 2 weeks and glucose-induced respiration (GIR) for 4 h. Results and discussion Rm increased with soil temperature increase at 60% WHC, but there were no significant differences between incubation at 5 and 15 °C with 30% WHC. Higher Rm was found at 60% WHC than at 30% WHC only when incubated at 15 and 25 °C. Both the high-low-high temperature incubation and GIR experiments indicated that decreased soil substrate availability weakened the responses of Rm to high temperature at 60% WHC, and there was no microbial thermal acclimation to temperature over the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Soils and Sediments Springer Journals

Decreased soil substrate availability with incubation time weakens the response of microbial respiration to high temperature in an alpine meadow on the Tibetan Plateau

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/decreased-soil-substrate-availability-with-incubation-time-weakens-the-s5YRUQclOi
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Environment; Soil Science & Conservation; Environment, general; Environmental Physics
ISSN
1439-0108
eISSN
1614-7480
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11368-018-1995-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose Increased microbial respiration (Rm) usually decreases with warming time in incubation and field manipulative exper- iments, and substrate depletion and/or microbial thermal acclimation to warming is hypothesized to be responsible for this decrease. However, few studies have been conducted to determine the mechanism for this decrease, especially in alpine regions. Materials and methods First, soils taken from an alpine meadow on the Tibetan Plateau were incubated at three different temperatures (i.e., 5, 15, and 25 °C) with two soil moistures (i.e., 30 and 60% water holding capacity (WHC)) for 58 days, then another two experiments were conducted with incubation at high-low-high temperature (i.e., 25–15–25 °C) for 2 weeks and glucose-induced respiration (GIR) for 4 h. Results and discussion Rm increased with soil temperature increase at 60% WHC, but there were no significant differences between incubation at 5 and 15 °C with 30% WHC. Higher Rm was found at 60% WHC than at 30% WHC only when incubated at 15 and 25 °C. Both the high-low-high temperature incubation and GIR experiments indicated that decreased soil substrate availability weakened the responses of Rm to high temperature at 60% WHC, and there was no microbial thermal acclimation to temperature over the

Journal

Journal of Soils and SedimentsSpringer Journals

Published: May 28, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off