Decreased expression of Flightless I, a gelsolin family member and developmental regulator, in early-gestation fetal wounds improves healing

Decreased expression of Flightless I, a gelsolin family member and developmental regulator, in... Up until late in the third trimester of gestation and through to adulthood, the healing response acts more to regenerate than to repair a wound. The mechanisms underlying this “scar-free” healing remain unknown although the actin cytoskeleton has a major role. Flightless I (Flii), an actin-remodelling protein and essential developmental regulator, negatively affects wound repair but its effect on scar-free fetal healing is unknown. Using fetal skin explants from E17 (regenerate) and E19 (repair) rats, the function of Flii in fetal wound repair was determined. Expression of Flii increased between E17 and E19 days of gestation and wounding transiently increased Flii expression in E17 but not E19 wounds. However, both confocal and immunofluorescent analysis showed E17 keratinocytes immediately adjacent to the wounds downregulated Flii. As a nuclear coactivator and inhibitor of proliferation and migration, the absence of Flii in cells at the edge of the wound could be instrumental in allowing these cells to proliferate and migrate into the wound deficit. In contrast, Flii was strongly expressed within the cytoplasm and nucleus of keratinocytes within epidermal cells at the leading edge of E19 wounded fetal skin explants. This increase in Flii expression in E19 wounds could affect the way these cells migrate into the wound space and contribute to impaired wound healing. Neutralising Flii protein improved healing of early- but not late-gestation wounds. Flii did not colocalise with actin cables formed around E17 wounds suggesting an independent mechanism of action distinct from its actin-binding function in scar-free wound repair. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalian Genome Springer Journals

Decreased expression of Flightless I, a gelsolin family member and developmental regulator, in early-gestation fetal wounds improves healing

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Life Sciences; Zoology ; Cell Biology; Anatomy
ISSN
0938-8990
eISSN
1432-1777
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00335-011-9320-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Up until late in the third trimester of gestation and through to adulthood, the healing response acts more to regenerate than to repair a wound. The mechanisms underlying this “scar-free” healing remain unknown although the actin cytoskeleton has a major role. Flightless I (Flii), an actin-remodelling protein and essential developmental regulator, negatively affects wound repair but its effect on scar-free fetal healing is unknown. Using fetal skin explants from E17 (regenerate) and E19 (repair) rats, the function of Flii in fetal wound repair was determined. Expression of Flii increased between E17 and E19 days of gestation and wounding transiently increased Flii expression in E17 but not E19 wounds. However, both confocal and immunofluorescent analysis showed E17 keratinocytes immediately adjacent to the wounds downregulated Flii. As a nuclear coactivator and inhibitor of proliferation and migration, the absence of Flii in cells at the edge of the wound could be instrumental in allowing these cells to proliferate and migrate into the wound deficit. In contrast, Flii was strongly expressed within the cytoplasm and nucleus of keratinocytes within epidermal cells at the leading edge of E19 wounded fetal skin explants. This increase in Flii expression in E19 wounds could affect the way these cells migrate into the wound space and contribute to impaired wound healing. Neutralising Flii protein improved healing of early- but not late-gestation wounds. Flii did not colocalise with actin cables formed around E17 wounds suggesting an independent mechanism of action distinct from its actin-binding function in scar-free wound repair.

Journal

Mammalian GenomeSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 13, 2011

References

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